Fencing

Fencing is the art of defence with the sword.

fencing

  1. a barrier that serves to enclose an area
  2. receive stolen goods
  3. surround with a wall in order to fortify
  4. have an argument about something

Fencing

Fencing is the martial art of fighting with blades. The most common version of fencing today, also called olympic fencing or competitive fencing, is divided into three weapon categories: foil, sabre (spelled saber in the United States) and épée. Classical fencing uses the same three weapons, but approaches fencing as a martial art. Competitive f...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fencing

Fencing

• (imp. & p. p. Fenced (/) ; p. pr. & vb. n.) of Fence • (v. i.) The aggregate of the fences put up for inclosure or protection; as, the fencing of a farm. • (n.) The art or practice of attack and defense with the sword, esp. with the smallsword. See Fence, v. i., 2. • (v. i.) The act of building a fence. • (v. i.) The mate...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fencing/

fencing

noun the art or sport of fighting with swords (especially the use of foils or epees or sabres to score points under a set of rules)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Fencing

[computing] Fencing is the process of isolating a node of a computer cluster or protecting shared resources when a node appears to be malfunctioning. As the number of nodes in a cluster increases, so does the likelihood that one of them may fail at some point. The failed node may have control over shared resources that need to be reclaimed ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fencing_(computing)

Fencing

Fen'cing noun 1. The art or practice of attack and defense with the sword, esp. with the smallsword. See Fence , intransitive verb , 2. 2. Disputing or debating in a manner resembling the art of fencers. Shak. 3. The materials used for b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/18

Fencing

Cleft (split) chestnut fencing provides a long lasting and attractive alternative to treated softwoods. Chestnut and oak gate and fencing posts are also produced from coppiced woodlands (see also Continuous Woven Fencing, Hurdles & Hurdle Panels).
Found on http://www.coppice-products.co.uk/Glossary.htm

Fencing

Fencing is slang for the business of buying and selling stolen property.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZF.HTM

Fencing

Fencing is the art of attack and defence with sword or rapier, no shield being used. It was in Italy in the 16th century that the skilful use of the small sword first became common. The art spread to Spain and then to France, where, on account of the prevalence of duelling, it was brought to a high degree of development.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/OF.HTM

fencing

fencing, sport of dueling with foil, épée, and saber.Sections in this article:IntroductionModern FencingHistoryBibliography
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sports/A0818435.html

fencing

organized sport involving the use of the sword—épée, foil, or sabre—for attack and defense according to set movements and rules. Although the use of ... [22 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/16

Fencing

Purchasing or selling illegal goods for resale.
Found on http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/A_Magical_Medieval_City_Guide_%28DnD_Other%29/

fencing

Sport of fighting with swords including the foil, derived from the light weapon used for practising duels; the épée, a heavier weapon derived from the duelling sword proper; and the sabre, with a curved handle and narrow V-shaped blade. In sabre fighting, cuts count as well as thrusts. Masks and protective jackets are worn, an...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0021687.html

fencing

[n] - the act or art of using a sword as in fencing
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fencing
No exact match found