Eocene

[n] - from 40 million to 58 million years ago
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Eocene

Eocene

E'o·cene adjective [ Greek ... daybreak, dawn + ... new, recent.] (Geol.) Pertaining to the first in time of the three subdivisions into which the Tertiary formation is divided by geologists, and alluding to the approximation in its life to that of the present era; as, Eocene deposits. --
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/52

Eocene

Eocene epoch noun from 58 million to 40 million years ago; presence of modern mammals
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Eocene

• (a.) Pertaining to the first in time of the three subdivisions into which the Tertiary formation is divided by geologists, and alluding to the approximation in its life to that of the present era; as, Eocene deposits. • (n.) The Eocene formation.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/eocene/

Eocene

Eocene 1. The epoch of geologic time, 55 million to 38 million years ago, during which the ancestors of many modern animals appeared. 2. Etymology: from Greek eos, 'dawn' + Greek kainos, 'new'.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/407/

Eocene

The second geological epoch of the Tertiary period of the Cenozoic era. It extended from the end of the Paleocene epoch, about 54 million years ago, to the beginning of the Oligocene epoch, about 34 million years ago. The oldest known fossils of most of the modern orders of mammals appear within a s...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/Eocene.html

Eocene

An epoch of the lower Tertiary period, spanning the time between 55.5 and 33.7 million years ago. Its name is from the Greek words 'eos' (dawn) and 'ceno' (new).
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21202

Eocene

The Eocene n (symbol E{font|o|size=75%} ) epoch, lasting from {ma|Eocene|Oligocene|million years ago}, is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the Cenozoic Era. The Eocene spans the time from the end of the Palaeocene Epoch to the beginning of the Oligocene Epoch. The start of the Eocene...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eocene
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