Elision

The suppression of a vowel or syllable for metrical purposes. E.g. 'The sedge has wither'd from the lake' from La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Keats. The elision, in this case, ensures that the line remains octosyllabic. Modern poets no longer use elision. See also synalepha.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

elision

[n] - omission of a sound between two words (usually a vowel and the end of one word or the beginning of the next)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=elision

elision

noun omission of a sound between two words (usually a vowel and the end of one word or the beginning of the next)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

elision

(Latin: `striking out`), in prosody, the slurring or omission of a final unstressed vowel that precedes either another vowel or a weak consonant ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/22

elision

omission of a consonant (e.g., 'ere' for 'ever') or a vowel (e.g., 'tother' for 'the other'), usually to achieve a metrical effect.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

elision

Technique used in poetry: vowels or syllables are left out in order to maintain the correct metre in a line.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Elision

[French] In French, elision refers to the suppression of a final unstressed vowel (usually [ə]) immediately before another word beginning with a vowel. The term also refers to the orthographic convention by which the deletion of a vowel is reflected in writing, and indicated with an apostrophe. == Written French == In written French, elisi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elision_(French)

Elision

Elision is the omission of one or more sounds (such as a vowel, a consonant, or a whole syllable) in a word or phrase, producing a result that is easier for the speaker to pronounce. Sometimes, sounds may be elided for euphonic effect. In Native English, elision comes naturally, and it is often described as `slurred` or `muted.` Often, elision...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elision

Elision

(verb form, elide) (1) In poetry, when the poet takes a word that ends in a vowel, and a following w
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Elision

Omission of a consonant (e.g., 'ere' for 'ever') or a vowel (e.g., 'tother' for 'the other'), usuall
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429
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