Denarius

A Roman Silver (Ag) coin. This was the main coin of the currency - being 10 asses. By Diocletian in the 3rd century AD it had been superseded.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Denarius

Even after the denarius was no longer regularly issued, it continued to be used as a unit of account, and the name was applied to later Roman coins in a way that is not understood. The Arabs who conquered large parts of the land that once belonged to the Eastern Roman Empire issued their own gold dinar. The lasting legacy of the denarius can be se...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denarius

Denarius

• (n.) A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the `penny` of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally ten of the pieces called as.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/denarius/

Denarius

(Ancient Money Terms:) The Roman penny. Hence the abbreviation 'd' for the English silver penny which for many centuries was the most common the coin in circulation. Although sometimes 'clipped' or 'debased,' the English silver penny contained a standard weight of silver and so could be traded across Europe.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm

denarius

(from the article `coin`) Adjustment of the previously fluctuating relationship between bronze and silver was first secured by the issue about 211 of the silver denarius ... The Roman experience was very different. Not long after the silver denarius, patterned after the Greek drachma, was introduced about 212 , the prior ... ...or O...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/30

Denarius

(Latin) a Roman silver coin; this coin was the equivalent initially of ten asses, but was later equal to about sixteen.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

denarius

(Plural: denarii) Roman silver coin, later debased, roughly equal to a Greek drachm. Initiated in 268 B.C, it equaled 16 asses; 25 denarii equals 1 gold aureus.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10143

Denarius

De·na'ri·us noun ; plural Denarii . [ Latin See 2d Denier .] A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the 'penny' of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally ten of the pieces called as .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/35

Denarius

A silver Roman coin, produced during the Republic and the first three centuries of the Empire. Sixteen times the value of an as, four times the value of a sestertius. The plural is 'denarii'.
Found on http://www.forumancientcoins.com/

denarius

An ancient Roman silver coin weighing about 3 grams, roughly the same size as a U.S. dime but much thicker.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10142

Denarius

Ancient Measurement Terms: The English silver penny, hence the abbreviation 'd' and the coin in most common circulation. Although they were sometimes 'clipped' or 'debased,' the English silver penny contained a standard weight of silver and so could be traded across Europe. Introduced by the Romans.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

Denarius

Roman silver coin, post-210 BC. Origin of the dinar, Arabian gold coin of the Middle Ages, and the Yugoslavian coin of today.
Found on http://www.austrian-mint.com/5

Denarius

The denarius was the chief Roman silver coin. It was first minted in 269 BC and was equal in value to ten of the copper coins called as.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/JD.HTM

Denarius

The standard Roman silver coin.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary030.htm
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