Conching

The processing step called
Found on http://www.chocolatesource.com/glossary/index.asp

conching

Raw unprocessed chocolate is not yet ready to eat, because it is too gritty. To make it smooth, liquid and rich, it is rolled and kneaded until it achieves the desired state. Special machines designed to perform this action contain rollers that are shaped like conches, giving the process its name.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21710

Conching

A process invented by Rudolph Lindt in 1879, which breaks down the particles making up chocolate by gentle heating and kneading. This improves the texture of the chocolate and produces more mellow flavours by driving out bitterness.
Found on http://www.hotelchocolat.co.uk/Chocolat-Glossary-ACHOCOLATE_GLOSSARY/

conching

(from the article `cocoa`) Conching, a flavour-developing, aerating, and emulsifying procedure performed by conche machines, requires from 4 to 72 hours, depending on the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/124

Conching

Conching is a texture and flavor improvement process carried out by any of a variety of different machines called conches or refiner-conches. The process, which generally follows refining, takes place over the course of several hours to three days or more depending upon the machine, the chocolate maker's vision regarding chocolate flavor and textur...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22181

conching

A mechanical kneading process which improves the texture and taste of chocolate by driving out astringency. Conching time is the amount of hours the chocolate spends in this process and can vary from 12 hours to 120 hours.
Found on http://www.hotelchocolat.com/uk/about/glossary
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