Bioarchaeology

The term bioarchaeology was first coined by British archaeologist Grahame Clark in 1972 as a reference to zooarchaeology, or the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Redefined in 1977 by Jane Buikstra, bioarchaeology in the US now refers to the scientific study of human remains from archaeological sites, a discipline known in other cou...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioarchaeology

bioarchaeology

(from the article `anthropology`) Bioarchaeologists test hypotheses about relative mortality, population movements, wars, social status, political organization, and other demographic, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/66

bioarchaeology

bioarchaeology, bioarcheology 1. The use of a range of biological techniques on archaeological material in order to learn more about past populations. 2. A subdiscipline of biology that integrates the concepts of human biology with those of anthropological archaeology. In bioarchaeology, one might isolate and amplify DNA from very old bones; such ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/179/5

Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology: The use of a range of biological techniques on archaeological material in order to learn more about past populations. In bioarchaeology, one might isolate and amplify DNA from very old bones such as from the frozen body of the 9,000-year-old Ice Man who was found in the Italian Alps. From bio- (living) + archaeology (the study of th...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33158
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