Bracketing

A process used by researchers working within the Husserlian phenomenological tradition to identify their preconceived beliefs and opinions about the phenomenon under investigation in order to clarify how personal biases and experience might influence what is seen, heard and reported
Found on http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/information/glossary/

Bracketing

In photography, bracketing is the general technique of taking several shots of the same subject using different camera settings. Bracketing is useful and often recommended in situations that make it difficult to obtain a satisfactory image with a single shot, especially when a small variation in exposure parameters has a comparatively large effect...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracketing

Bracketing

• (n.) A series or group of brackets; brackets, collectively. • (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Bracket
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bracketing/

bracketing

(from the article `metaphysics`) ...order to rid his transcendental investigation of empirical prejudgments and to discover connections of meaning that are necessary truths ... ...investigation, as Husserl developed it himself—and on which he worked throughout his entire lifetime—is the `reduction`: the existence of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/103

Bracketing

[linguistics] In linguistics, particularly linguistic morphology, bracketing is a term of art that refers to how an utterance can be represented as a hierarchical tree of constituent parts. Analysis techniques based on bracketing are used at different levels of grammar, but are particularly associated with morphologically complex words. To ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracketing_(linguistics)

Bracketing

[phenomenology] Bracketing (Einklammerung; also called epoché or the phenomenological reduction) is a term in the philosophical school of phenomenology describing the act of suspending judgment about the natural world to instead focus on analysis of mental experience. ==Overview== Phenomenology, developed by Edmund Husserl (1859–1938), c...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracketing_(phenomenology)

Bracketing

Brack'et·ing noun (Architecture) A series or group of brackets; brackets, collectively.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/89

Bracketing

Camera meters cannot always meter a scene correctly because they must meter over a great deal of the frame. If you are unsure of the camera settings and want to make sure one of the shots is acceptable the best way to ensure that the shot comes out is to bracket. Bracketing involves shooting one exposure at the metered value, then shoot the next ex...
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

bracketing

Shooting the same scene with several different F-stops.
Found on https://www.nyfa.edu/student-resources/glossary/

Bracketing

Technique of shooting a number of pictures of the same subject and viewpoint at different levels of
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Photography/

Bracketing

The filming of several takes of the same shot at different f-stops to achieve the desired result. Usually this technique is applied to shooting titles much more than anything else. (It is a good idea to film a few frames of black in-between, since it is sometimes difficult to tell where the camera was stopped.)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21112

Bracketing

The technique of taking a number of pictures of the same subject at different levels of exposure. At half and one stop differences, depending on subject and film type. (see f-stop)
Found on http://www.peterashbyhayter.co.uk/glossaryT-Z.html

Bracketing

This is an excellent method of coming to an understanding of the f/stop function. It is a technique in which takes a subject and takes a number of pictures from the same viewpoint at differing levels of exposure. Half or one f/stop (+/-) differences are usually selected depending on the subject.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21469

Bracketing

used in semiotics to indicate the suspension of interest (for analytic purposes) in the relationship between signs and their referents. The term is also helpful in understanding the mental attitude required when doing discourse analysis or any analytic approach that treats text as a topic rather than a resource. Instead of considering the claims ma...
Found on http://people.brunel.ac.uk/~hsstcfs/glossary.htm
No exact match found