bocage

A French term meaning 'thicket', used to describe ceramic foliage or flowers that provide a background for a central subject. Bocage is typical of ROCOCO style, often framing figures in a canopy or arbour, and was particularly popular from the 1750s to the 1770s.

Bocage

(from the article `Ronsard, Pierre de`) ...influences, he found fresh inspiration in the recently discovered verse of the Greek poet Anacreon (6th century ). The more playful touch ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/84

bocage

A French term meaning thicket, used to describe ceramic foliage or flowers that provide a background for a central subject. Bocage is typical of rococo style, often framing figures in a canopy or arbour, and was particularly popular from the 1750s to the 1770s.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-b.html

bocage

in western France (e.g., Bocage Normand, Bocage Vendéen), a well-wooded district in distinction to the campagne, which denotes a hedgeless tract of ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/84
No exact match found