Anastrophe

Anastrophe (from the ἀναστροφή, anastrophē, `a turning back or about`) is a figure of speech in which the syntactically correct order of subject, verb and object is changed. For example, the usual English order of subject, object and verb might be changed to object-subject-verb, as in saying `potatoes I like` to mean `I like potato...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anastrophe

Anastrophe

• (n.) An inversion of the natural order of words; as, echoed the hills, for, the hills echoed.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/anastrophe/

anastrophe

inversion noun the reversal of the normal order of words
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Anastrophe

A·nas'tro·phe noun [ Greek ..., from ... to turn up or back; ... + ... to turn.] (Rhet. & Gram.) An inversion of the natural order of words; as, echoed the hills , for, the hills echoed .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/78

Anastrophe

Inversion of the natural word order.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary083.htm

Anastrophe

Inverted order of words or events as a rhetorical scheme. Anastrophe is specifically a type of hyper
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

anastrophe

reversing or inverting word order as rhetorical device
Found on http://phrontistery.info/a.html

Anastrophe

transposition of normal word order; most often found in Latin in the case of prepositions and the words they control. Anastrophe is a form of hyperbaton.
*The helmsman steered; the ship moved on; yet never a breeze up blew. Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
*Isdem in oppidis, Cicero
*Demosthenes, On the Crown 13
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

anastrophe

[n] - the reversal of the normal order of words
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=anastrophe
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