Anaphora

the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses or lines.
*We shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall...
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Anaphora

The repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of lines e.g. Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

anaphora

[n] - using a pronoun or other pro-word instead of repeating a word
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=anaphora

Anaphora

A·naph'o·ra noun [ Latin , from Greek ..., from ... to carry up or back; ... + ... to carry.] (Rhet.) A repetition of a word or of words at the beginning of two or more successive clauses.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/78

anaphora

noun using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=anaphora

Anaphora

• (n.) A repetition of a word or of words at the beginning of two or more successive clauses.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/anaphora/

anaphora

(Greek: `a carrying up or back`), a literary or oratorical device involving the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several sentences ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/68

anaphora

anaphora, anaphoric 1. The use of the same word or phrase at the beginning of several successive clauses, sentences, lines, or verses; usually for emphasis or rhetorical effect; as in, 'She didn't speak. She didn't stand. She didn't even look up when we came in.' `We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1645/

anaphora

successive phrases, clauses, or lines start with the same word or words. Emily Brontë's 'Remembrance,' for example, repeats its opening phrase, 'Cold in the earth.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

anaphora

Very often used device in speeches or ballads. It means that the same words or groups of words are used in successive lines, sentences, or paragraphs.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Anaphora

[liturgy] The Anaphora is the most solemn part of the Divine Liturgy and Mass during which the offerings of bread and wine are consecrated as the body and blood of Christ. This is the usual name for this part of the Liturgy in Greek-speaking Eastern Christianity. In western Christian traditions which have a comparable rite, the Anaphora is ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaphora_(liturgy)

Anaphora

[linguistics] In linguistics, anaphora ə is the use of an expression the interpretation of which depends upon another expression in context (its antecedent or postcedent). In the sentence Sally arrived, but nobody saw her, the pronoun her is anaphoric, referring back to Sally. The term anaphora denotes the act of referring, whereas the wor...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaphora_(linguistics)

Anaphora

[rhetoric] In rhetoric, an Anaphora (ἀναφορά, `carrying back`) is a rhetorical device that consists of repeating a sequence of words at the beginnings of neighboring clauses, thereby lending them emphasis. In contrast, an epistrophe (or epiphora) is repeating words at the clauses` ends. The combination of anaphora and epistrophe res...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaphora_(rhetoric)

Anaphora

Several consecutive sentences all starting with the same words. For example I will not give up. I will do it. I will succeed.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary.html

Anaphora

(Greek, 'carried again,' also called epanaphora) The intentional repetition of beginning clauses in
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Anaphora

Successive phrases, clauses, or lines start with the same word or words. Emily bront
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

anaphora

repetition of a word at beginning of successive phrases for emphasis
Found on http://phrontistery.info/a.html
No exact match found