Alexandrine

Originally a twelve syllable meter in French prosody. However, the English equivalent is the iambic hexameter - see meter. An example of alexandrine verse is Testament of Beauty by Robert Bridges.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Alexandrine

[n] - a line of verse that has six iambic feet
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Alexandrine

Alexandrine

Al`ex·an'drine adjective Belonging to Alexandria; Alexandrian. Bancroft.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/53

Alexandrine

noun (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Alexandrine

• (a.) Belonging to Alexandria; Alexandrian. • (n.) A kind of verse consisting in English of twelve syllables.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/alexandrine/

alexandrine

verse form that is the leading measure in French poetry. It consists of a line of 12 syllables with major stresses on the 6th syllable (which ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/44

alexandrine

a metrical line of six feet or twelve syllables (in English), originally from French heroic verse. Randle Cotgrave in his 1611 French-English dictionary explains: 'Alexandrin. A verse of 12, or 13 sillables.' In his 'Essay on Criticism,' Alexander Pope says, 'A needless Alexandrine ends the song / That like a wounded snake, drags its slow length al...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

alexandrine

alexandrine (ăl"igzăn'drēn", –drīn") , in prosody, a line of 12 syllables (or 13 if the last syllable is unstressed). Its name probably derives from the fact that some poems of the 12th and 13th cent. about Alexander the Great were written in this meter....
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0803259.html

Alexandrine

In prosody, Alexandrine is the name given, from an old French poem on Alexander the Great, to a species of verse, which consists of six iambic feet, or twelve syllables, the pause being, in correct Alexandrines, always on the sixth syllable; for example, the second of the following verses:
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AA.HTM

Alexandrine

An alexandrine is a line of poetic meter comprising 12 syllables. Alexandrines are common in the German literature of the Baroque period and in French poetry of the early modern and modern periods. Drama in English often used alexandrines before Marlowe and Shakespeare, by whom it was supplanted by iambic pentameter (5-foot verse). In non-Anglo-Sa...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandrine

Alexandrine

A twelve-syllable line written in iambic hexameter. Alexandrines were especially popular in French p
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Alexandrine

A metrical line of six feet or twelve syllables (in english), originally from french heroic verse. R
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429
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