Copy of `Bikeline - Cycling terms`

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Bikeline - Cycling terms
Category: Sport and Leisure > Biking
Date & country: 01/02/2014, UK
Words: 222


ABA
The American Bicycle Association, the world's largest sanctioning BMX organization.

abubaca
A trick where the rider goes straight up the ramp and while they are still facing forward they tap the back tire to the coping/obstacle, then drop back down the ramp riding backwards or fakie. The rider's body faces the same direction through the whole trick.

adventure race
A multi-discipline team race that varies in length and distance from a few hours to several days. Involves multiple sports such as cycling, running, orienteering, boating, rappelling, etc.

aero
(Say: air - o) - Slang for aerodynamic, streamlined. Anything that helps a cyclist cheat his main opponent, the wind. Aero devices include handlebars, bullet-shaped helmets, even windshields.

aero helmet
A special helmet with a streamlined shape to reduce wind drag and offer an advantage in races against the clock. Often pretty funny looking.

aftermarket
A component or accessory that wasn't intended to be used as original equipment on stock bicycles.

all mountain
As in all-mountain bicycle, this means a bike or ride that encompasses all types of off-road terrain, climbs, descents, technical and jumping.

Allen wrench
A hexagonally shaped tool for turning the ubiquitous recessed bolts found on bicycles. There are L-shaped Allen wrenches, ones with screwdriver handles and ones with ball-ends so that you can turn bolts in tight spaces. Get a set for your toolbox and on-the-road/trail kit that includes at least 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8mm wrenches, and you'll be prepared to fix most things.

Alpe d'Huez
A legendary Tour de France climb to the French ski station of the same name, Alpe d'Huez is renowned for its brutal steepness and 21 switchbacks, each bearing the name of a past Tour stage winner. The Alpe became the Tour

aluminum
(Say: aloo - min - um) - A super-light, durable and affordable material that's widely used for bicycle frames and components.

anaerobic
(Say: an - air - o - bick) - Cycling or exercising at a pace that causes labored breathing because you're struggling to get enough oxygen. Obviously, you can't keep at it for long.

anchor bolt
The bolt on brakes and derailleurs that is tightened to hold the cable in place.

Armstrong, Lance
Once America

Ashtabula crank
(Say: ash - ta - beau - la) - Also called a one-piece crank, this is a steel crankset found in some cruisers and BMX bicycles. It's simple, heavy, durable and named after a town in Ohio.

ATB
(Say: A - T - B) - For All Terrain Bike (another term for a mountain bike).

autobus
This stage racing term (the Tour de France is the most famous stage race) is used for the group of racers riding near the back who work together to finish the stage just before the time limit expires.

baby head
In mountain biking, this is a section of trail with loose rocks about the size of a baby's head.

bacon
Slang for scabs, cuts, scars and other scrapes and abrasions from crashing. See also: road rash.

bail
To ditch (toss away) your bike before a crash, oftentimes done mid-flight during a jump.

bank
A sloped embankment under 90 degrees. Found on dirt (MTB and BMX riding) and paved and wood tracks (track racing).

bar plugs
Little caps that are pressed into/onto the ends of handlebars to seal them and for protection from puncture wounds should you crash and land on the bars.

bar spin
A trick where the rider releases and spins the handlebars. The standard bar spin is one full rotation of the handlebars, however riders can spin the bars twice, even three times, etc. This trick is often coupled with other tricks to add to the degree of difficulty.

bar(s)
Short for handlebar(s).

bashguard
A mountain bike accessory that protects the chainrings/crankset from damage should you run into a rock, log, etc. when you're riding over it.

bell lap
In races with laps, like criteriums which typically race around city blocks, or cyclocross, which follows a fixed route, the bell lap is when the official at the starting line rings a bell. This is done either to signal a one-lap race within the race to contest a mid-race prime (the winner of that lap gets a prize), or as a signal that you're on the final lap and it's time to do your best to win.

berm
A small or large raised embankment usually in a corner that allows you to maintain speed without losing traction and sliding out.

bike lust
A common affliction for all cyclists, this is slang for when you covet new bicycles, accessories or anything cycling.

binder bolt
(Say: byen - der bolt) - Found on stems and frames, a binder bolt is what tightens a seatpost in a frame and a handlebar in a stem. Usually, binder bolts are Allens.

bladder
The part of a hydration system that holds liquid. Bladders are made from polyurethane or similar materials, are often antimicrobial to fight germs and bacteria, and come in various sizes up to 100 fluid ounces.

blow up
You have to pace yourself on rides, especially hilly or long ones, or you might blow up and tire yourself out so much you have to stop, or find another way to get home. You can blow up due to riding too hard, too far and by not drinking or eating enough.

BMX
Bicycle Moto Cross. A popular type of racing, trick riding and jumping usually done on 20-inch-wheel one-speed bikes.

boot
A tire patch. Place it between the tube and tire to cover a gash in the tire's casing that otherwise would not contain the tube. Almost anything can be used as a boot, even paper money and roadside trash.

brake booster
A horseshoe-shaped add-on sometimes used on older mountain-bike rim brakes to increase braking power by eliminating flex from the brake posts (what the brakes mount to).

brake bridge
The small diameter tube on the frame that runs between the two seatstays and on road bikes, where a rear sidepull brake is mounted.

brake fade
Usually caused by wear or improper adjustment, this is when the brakes lose power while you're braking. Bad brake fade can be scary and dangerous.

breakaway
To ride away from the peloton in an effort to win a race. Because the peloton can ride much faster than an individual, breaking away is often a futile effort and leads to exhaustion, with the peloton eventually catching the rider. However, sometimes the attack pays off and the rider captures a dramatic win.

brevet
(Say: bruh-vay) - A brevet is an official randonneuring ride of at least 200 kilometers usually completed to qualify for longer and major events, such as Paris-Brest-Paris and Boston-Montreal-Boston. Just as on the longer events, in order to officially complete a brevet you must ride the entire route and stop at checkpoints along the way between certain times to get your route card signed. Failure to do this means the ride doesn't count.

brinelling
When a bike mechanic says a part is brinelled, it refers to components with bearings inside, like headsets or hubs. If they are brinelled, they've worn out over time and there's a pattern of dents in the bearing track.

cage
The part of the front derailleur the chain passes through. Also, that thing that holds your bottle, which is called a bottle cage.

cantilever brakes
(Say: cant - ee - lee - ver brakes) - A type of brake comprised of two arms that bolt to posts attached to the frame and fork with a crossover cable that connect the two. Common on mountain and touring bikes, cantilevers provide excellent braking power.

captain
What the front person on a tandem (a bicycle built for two) is called.

carbon fiber
One of the lightest frame and component materials, carbon fiber (also called just carbon) is unique in that it's a fabric, not a metal. This allows gossamer weights, incredible strength and impressive frame/fork compliance (vibration damping) because the fibers can be oriented in myriad ways.

cardiovascular
(Say: Card - ee-o - vask - you - lar) - Having to do with the heart and blood-supply system.

cartridge bearings
A bicycle-component bearing that is self contained and pressed in place. It's designed to be easier to replace when worn out. Sealed cartridge bearings have covers to keep dirt and grit from getting inside and contaminating the bearings and grease inside.

case
Not jumping the total distance of an obstacle and coming up short causing the rear wheel to tag the landing in an awkward, un-smooth style possibly resulting in a crash.

casing
(Say: kay - sing) - The material that makes up tire sidewalls.

cassette
The cluster of gears on the rear wheel of a bicycle. A cassette differs from a freewheel (which is also a cluster of gears on the rear wheel) in that it fits onto a splined interface on the hub. Freewheels are screwed onto threaded hubs. Also, cassettes do not include the drive mechanism while freewheels do.

chain guide
An accessory usually on a bicycle with one chainring and derailleur gears, that is mounted over the chainring to keep the chain from dropping off. Often found on downhill bikes.

chain keeper
A small device that's usually attached to the frame to keep the chain from falling off the small front chainring when you shift onto it. This is sometimes an issue with compact cranksets that have a bigger difference in the chainring sizes.

chain tensioner
A device that keeps the chain tight on singlespeed and one-speed bicycles that weren't specifically designed for a given chain length (those bikes don't require tensioners). There are many types. The most common ones are mounted at the rear axle or on the derailleur hanger. Axle-mounted tensioners typically use bolts to pull the rear wheel back and tension the chain, while derailleur-hanger tensioners use a sprung arm with a pulley.

chainline
The path the chain takes from the chainrings (in front) to the cogs (in back). Check chainline by placing a straightedge between the chainrings and seeing where it lines up on the cogs. Ideally the chainline will be in line with an imaginary line that bisects the chainrings and cogs. That will ensure a smooth, quiet-running chain and smooth shifting. If the chainline is misaligned it can cause shifting problems and even possibly throw the chain off.

chainstay bridge
The short small-diameter frame tube that runs between and connects the chainstays.

chainstay guard
Anything applied to, or wrapped around the right chainstay to protect it from the chain, which has a tendency to strike that chainstay (and can ding the finish) when you ride over bumps.

chainstays
The twin smaller-diameter tubes on a bicycle frame that run from the bottom bracket to the rear axle. They

chamois
(Say: shammy) - The pad found inside most cycling shorts that cushions, wicks and breathes to ensure top comfort and protection. It also reduces friction and is seam-free to eliminate pressure points and chafing. Interestingly, the chamois was originally made of a thin leather just like the chamois you might use to dry your car. Today there are still leather ones but most are made of synthetic material, which often even includes antibacterial properties for additional protection and comfort.

chrome
(Say: k - rome) - A plating treatment that leaves a super-hard mirror-like finish.

chromoly
(Say: k - rome - molly) - Short for chrome-molybdenum, a high-quality type of steel tubing.

chunder
Loose trail debris, rocks, roots, etc.

circuit race
Usually a multi-lap road race around a course that exceeds one mile (versus criterium races that are held on shorter courses).

classic
Traditionally, a single-day European road race on the professional calendar. Examples include Paris-Roubaix, Milan-San-Remo and Liege-Bastogne-Liege.

cleats
The parts that are attached to the soles of cycling shoes that connect the shoes to the pedals for more efficient pedaling.

col
(Say: cole) - French for a mountain pass.

compact crankset
A double-chainring crankset designed to provide easier gearing by using smaller chainrings than found on standard cranksets. These typically feature 39- and 53-tooth rings, while compacts usually have 34- and 50-tooth rings.

compact frame
Standard bicycle frames usually have top tubes that are parallel with the ground. Compact frames have sloping top tubes (lower at the seat tube). This can reduce frame weight, increase pedaling efficiency and speed handling. Compact and standard frames may fit riders differently.

composite
(Say: com - paws - it) - A frame tube or component comprised of more than one material. For example, a carbon composite includes carbon, aluminum and other elements.

coping
The top portion of the lip on a ramp or obstacle that is usually made of metal tubing, PVC pipe or rounded-off cement.

Crested Butte
As in Crested, Butte, Colorado, this is a mountain biking mecca. It's also famous as one of the first places the originators of the mountain bike ventured for epic off-road riding.

critical mass
This controversial, loosely organized monthly group ride takes place in large cities around the world, often during peak commuting hours. It's designed to promote cycling by reminding motorists that there are viable alternatives to driving. However, by impeding traffic, it may simply prejudice motorists against cyclists.

cross training
Participating in other sports for training besides cycling, such as running, hiking, swimming, etc.

cruiser
1. A bicycle made for casual riding. Features include a large, comfy saddle, wide handlebars and fat tires for a soft, flat-free ride. 2. A BMX bike with 24- and sometimes 26-inch wheels, often preferred by taller riders or adjusts returning to the sport. Cruisers race in their own separate class.

cruiser seat
A wide, thickly padded seat, such as the type usually found on cruisers.

cyclocross
A type of off-season bicycle racing (usually held October through January) around a loop course, which includes natural and man-made obstacles that force dismounting and running while carrying the bike. It was invented in Europe to keep racers fit through the winter.

cyclocross bike
A bicycle designed for the rigors of cyclocross racing with a light, responsive and rugged frame, fork and wheels, plus wide gearing, grippy tires and ample mud clearance. Cyclocross bicycles can be used for commuting, training, off-roading and training, too.

derailleur hanger
Also called a dropout hanger, this is the tab beneath the right rear dropout (not all bikes have these), which the rear derailleur is screwed into.

disc brake
A type of brake system that uses discs (called rotors) that are attached to the wheel hubs and calipers attached to the frame that grip the rotors when the levers are squeezed. Discs provide maximum speed control and stopping power even in wet and muddy conditions. Plus, because they do not rely on the rims for braking, wheel damage can't compromise braking the way it can with rim brakes.

disc wheel
Used for an aerodynamic edge, mostly in individual races against the clock, like time trials and triathlons, these high-tech wheels feature closed construction making them disc-like and super slippery so they slice through the wind for free speed.

DNR
Short for Did Not Race. If you register for a bicycle race or a century ride and then for some reason can't be there to ride it, the officials will usually put DNR next to your name. DNS is also used, for Did Not Start.

DNS
Short for Did Not Start. If you register for a bicycle race or a century ride and then for some reason can't be there to ride it, the officials will usually put DNS next to your name. DNR is also used, for Did Not Race.

domestique
(Say: doe - mess - teak) - A racer who sacrifices his own chance of victory to help a teammate win. Tasks of a domestique may include: carrying extra bottles and food for fellow riders, chasing breakaway groups, and even giving their bikes to the designated team leader should he have a mechanical problem.

double
1. Short for a double-chainring crankset. 2. A jump with a gap between the take-off and landing. 3. Short for double century (a 200-mile ride).

double century
A 200-mile road ride, usually completed in a day. Just like there are lots of popular organized centuries, there are also many organized doubles.

double-crown fork
A suspension fork that features two crowns, one above and one below the head tube. Usually, it's a long-travel fork and the additional crown reinforces the fork legs to improve suspension, control and handling at speed.

down tube
The frame tube that runs from the head tube to the bottom of the seat tube.

down-tube shifters
Shift levers that attach to the bicycle frame down tube. Once standard on bikes, they're now rare.

draft
To ride closely behind one or more fellow riders so that you are shielded from the wind, thereby saving considerable energy. The drafting effect increases as the size of a group grows, creating the potential for a number of riders to travel much faster than an individual cyclist.

drag
Aerodynamic forces that make you have to work harder and slow you down. In cycling, drag is the result of a number of things, including the wind speed and direction, plus the bicycle, equipment and clothing that all catch the air to some degree. This is why so many companies use wind tunnels in their bicycle design and testing process.

drivetrain
It's comprised of the crankset, chain, front and rear derailleurs and pedals.

dropout hanger
Also called a derailleur hanger, this is the tab beneath the right rear dropout (not all bikes have these), which the rear derailleur is screwed into.

dropper seatpost
A spring-loaded mountain-bike seatpost that can be lowered or raised while riding so that you can dial-in the perfect seat height for a given section of trail without having to stop and get off the bike.

dry lube
Chain lubricants that don't attract grit and grime and are best suited to dry riding conditions. They often include paraffin.

dual slalom
An exciting mountain biking event where two racers compete on side-by-side downhill slalom courses.

dual-suspension bike
A bicycle (usually designed for off-road use) with front and rear suspension.

elastomer
(Say: ee - last - oh - mer) - A type of spring used for bicycle suspensions. It's usually cylindrical and elastic. Elastomers are lighter than coil springs and offer some built-in damping (suspension control), too.

energy bar
A nutritious bar eaten before, during and after riding to keep your energy up and speed recovery.

ergometer
(Say: erg - om - met - er) - An indoor cycling device used for training and/or testing fitness.

fakie
Riding backwards.

false flat
1. A surprisingly difficult section of road that looks flat but is actually slightly uphill. Usually, no matter how hard you pedal you go way slower than you think you should be going. 2. A stretch on a long hill that looks flat and tricks you into thinking you've reached the top when there's still more climbing to come.

feeble
A trick where the back peg of the bike is grinding/stalling while the front tire is on top of the obstacle.

ferrules
(Say: fair - rules) - Metal or plastic caps that fit on the ends of cable housing. There are several types. Some are used to provide a perfect fit between the housing and stops the housing fit into on the frame. Others customize the end of the housing to fit in the brake and shift levers (but ferrules aren't used on certain components so always read the directions to be sure).

flair
A back flip combined with a 180-degree spin in which the rider lands riding forward going back in the direction from which he came, often done in a half-pipe or on a tall vert lip.