Vernacular

a localised style liked or performed by ordinary people.

Vernacular

See dialect verse.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

vernacular

[n] - the everyday speech of the people (as distinguished from literary language)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=vernacular

Vernacular

an indigenous building constructed of locally available materials, to local detail, usually without the benefit of an architect. Somehow it is now taken to imply a fairly humble or practical origin, but this is not the case. It could be argued that scottish towerhouses are vernacular buildin...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Vernacular

Vernacular architecture is the term used to indicate that the architecture is local to the region in which it is found and generated by the people of that region. The design is often produced by the work of craftsmen and builders rather than architects, and buildings are made of locally produced materials usually using traditional building methods....
Found on http://www.architecture.com/HowWeBuiltBritain/Glossary.xhtml

Vernacular

Ver·nac'u·lar adjective [ Latin vernaculus born in one's house, native, from verna a slave born in his master's house, a native, probably akin to Sanskrit vas to dwell, English was .] Belonging to the country of one's birth; one's own by birth or nature; native; indigenous;...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/17

vernacular

Belonging to the country of one's birth; one's own by birth or nature; native; indigenous; now used chiefly of language; as, English is our vernacular language. 'A vernacular disease.' 'His skill the vernacular dialect of the Celtic tongue.' (Fuller) 'Which in our vernacular idiom may be thus interpreted.' (Pope) ... Origin: L. Vernaculus born in o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

vernacular

noun the everyday speech of the people (as distinguished from literary language)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vernacular

Vernacular

• (n.) The vernacular language; one`s mother tongue; often, the common forms of expression in a particular locality. • (a.) Belonging to the country of one`s birth; one`s own by birth or nature; native; indigenous; -- now used chiefly of language; as, English is our vernacular language.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/vernacular/

vernacular

(from the article `dictionary`) Of all specialized dictionaries, the bilingual group are the most serviceable and frequently used. With the rise of the vernacular languages during ... [22 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/v/16

Vernacular

A vernacular or vernacular language is the native language or native dialect of a specific population, especially as distinguished from a literary, national or standard language, or a lingua franca used in the region or state inhabited by that population. == Etymology == The use of `vernacular` is not recent. In 1688, James Howell wrote: Concern.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernacular

Vernacular

The everyday or common language of a geographic area or the native language of commoners in a countr
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

vernacular

characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/158782

vernacular

The indigenous language or dialect of a community. This is an English term which refers to purely spoken forms of a language.
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html
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