tenor

  1. the adult male singing voice above baritone
  2. the pitch range of the highest male voice
  3. pervading note of an utterance

Tenor

Maturity of a loan.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20047

Tenor

See metaphor.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

tenor

[adj] - (of a musical instrument) intermediate between alto and baritone or bass 2. [adj] - of or close in range to the highest natural adult male voice 3. [n] - an adult male with a tenor voice 4. [n] - the adult male singing voice above baritone 5. [n] - pervading note of an utterance 6. [n] - the pitch range of the hig...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=tenor

Tenor

(voice) Highest pitch range of the male voice (see also: bass, baritone) (music) Instruments with a pitch range from about C-below-middle-C upwards about two octaves
Found on http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/glossary/glossary.h

Tenor

Ten'or noun [ Latin , from tenere to hold; hence, properly, a holding on in a continued course: confer French teneur . See Tenable , and confer Tenor a kind of voice.] 1. A state of holding on in a continuous course; manner of continuity; constant mode; general tende...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/26

tenor

1. A state of holding on in a continuous course; manner of continuity; constant mode; general tendency; course; career. 'Along the cool sequestered vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their away.' (Gray) ... 2. That course of thought which holds on through a discourse; the general drift or course of thought; purport; intent; meaning; unde...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

tenor

adjective of or close in range to the highest natural adult male voice; `tenor voice`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Tenor

• (n.) The higher of the two kinds of voices usually belonging to adult males; hence, the part in the harmony adapted to this voice; the second of the four parts in the scale of sounds, reckoning from the base, and originally the air, to which the other parts were auxillary. • (n.) Stamp; character; nature. • (n.) A state of holding ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/tenor/

tenor

highest male vocal range, normally extending approximately from the second B below middle C to the G above; an extremely high voice, extending into ... [5 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/25

Tenor

The length of time until a loan is due. For example, a loan is taken out with a two year tenor. After one year passes, the tenor of the loan is one year.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglost.htm

Tenor

Tenor is the name given to the highest natural singing voice of the adult male. It is also applied to instruments which play tenor parts.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VT.HTM

Tenor

Tenor is a cultivated variety of potato.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QT.HTM

Tenor

The highest natural male voice.
Found on http://www.greensboroopera.org/oft-education.shtml

tenor

tenor, highest natural male voice. In medieval polyphony, tenor was the name given to the voice that had the cantus firmus, a preexisting melody, often a fragment of plainsong, to which other voices in counterpoint were added. The cantus was arranged in notes of long duration, hence the term tenor, ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0848176.html

Tenor

The term fixed for payment of a draft. This word, applied to an instrument in pleading, signifies an exact copy; it differs from purport. In chancery practice, by tenor is understood a certified copy of records of other courts removed into chancery by certiorari.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/t018.htm

tenor

Highest range of the adult male singing voice when not using falsetto, approximately C3–A5. It is the preferred voice for operatic heroic roles. Well-known tenors are Luciano Pavarotti and Placido Domingo. It is also used before the name of an instrument that sounds in the same range as the ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019074.html

tenor

The term at which funds are payable, for example under Bills of Exchange. Commonly used tenors are 30, 60, 90, 180 days etc.
Found on http://www.londontrade.co.uk/?p=glossary:T

Tenor

A tenor is a type of classical male singing voice whose vocal range is one of the highest of the male voice types. The tenor`s vocal range (in choral music) lies between C3, the C one octave below middle C, and (A4), the A above middle C. In solo work, this range extends up to (C5), or `tenor high C`. The low extreme for tenors is roughly A{mus......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenor

tenor

the second lowest of the standard four voice ranges (bass, tenor, alto, soprano)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_musical_terminology

tenor

the second lowest of the standard four voice ranges (bass, tenor, alto, soprano)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_jazz_and_popular_music

tenor

the second lowest of the standard four voice ranges (bass, tenor, alto, soprano)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22287

Tenor

In common usage, tenor refers to the course of thought, meaning or emotion in anything written or sp
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Tenor

Male voice of high range. Also a part, often structural, in polyphony.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Tenor

The premium offered above the current market price in a tender offer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22402
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