telegraph

[n] - apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=telegraph

Telegraph

A method of transmitting a signal quickly prior to the introduction of radios and telephones. This allow a signal to be sent containing more information than possible with a beacon - perhaps being a flashing light or an device with arms - through the use of a code. Telegraphs were used alongside railway lines.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Telegraph

Tel'e·graph noun [ Greek ... far, far off (cf. Lithuanian toli ) + -graph : confer French télégraphe . See Graphic .] An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals r...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/20

telegraph

To convey or announce by telegraph. ... Origin: F. Telegraphier. ... An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical action. ... The instruments used are cla...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

telegraph

telegraphy noun apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=telegraph

Telegraph

• (n.) An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical action. • (v. t.) To convey or announce by telegraph.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/telegraph/

telegraph

any device or system that allows the transmission of information by coded signal over distance. Many telegraphic systems have been used over the ... [39 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/21

telegraph

telegraph 1. An apparatus for transmitting messages to a distance, usually by signs of some kind. Devices for this purpose have been in use from ancient times, but the name was first applied to that system invented by Chappe in France in 1792, consisting of an upright post with movable arms, the signals being made by various positions of the arms a...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2099/3

Telegraph

[Brisbane] The Telegraph was an evening newspaper published in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. It was first published on 1 October 1872 and its final edition appeared on 5 February 1988. In its day it was recognised as one of the best news pictorial newspapers in the country. Its Pink Sports edition (printed distinctively on pink newsprint...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraph_(Brisbane)

telegraph

telegraph, term originally applied to any device or system for distant communication by means of visible or audible signals, now commonly restricted to electrically operated devices. Attempts at long-distance communication date back thousands of years (see signaling). As electricity came into greate...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0848077.html

Telegraph

Telegraph is Australian slang for someone who warns of the movements of police and pursuing troopers.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZT.HTM

Telegraph

[sternwheeler 1914] Telegraph was a sternwheel steamboat that was operated on the Coquille River on the southern Oregon coast from 1914 to 1927. Telegraph is perhaps best known for having been in involved in collisions with rival steamboats, apparently as a result of fierce competition for business on the Coquille river. ==Design, construct...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraph_(sternwheeler_1914)

telegraph

apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1747872
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