spandrel

The corner space between an arch or circle and a rectangle. Originally an architectural term for the space between one arch and the next in arcading, it is used in the context of carpet and textile patterns. On a clock dial, spandrels refer to the ornamentation in the four corner spaces between the chapter ring and the dial plate. See box above.

Spandrel

A spandrel, less often spandril or splaundrel, is the space between two arches or between an arch and a rectangular enclosure. There are four or five accepted and cognate meanings of spandrel in architectural and art history, mostly relating to the space between a curved figure and a rectangular boundary - such as the space between the curve of an...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spandrel

Spandrel

The panels of a wall located between vision areas of windows, which conceal structural columns, floors, and shear walls.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

spandrel

[n] - an approximately triangular surface area between two adjacent arches and the horizontal plane above them
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=spandrel

Spandrel

• (n.) A narrow mat or passe partout for a picture. • (n.) The irregular triangular space between the curve of an arch and the inclosing right angle; or the space between the outer moldings of two contiguous arches and a horizontal line above them, or another arch above and inclosing them.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/spandrel/

spandrel

spandril noun an approximately triangular surface area between two adjacent arches and the horizontal plane above them
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=spandrel

Spandrel

[biology] In evolutionary biology, a spandrel is a phenotypic characteristic that is a byproduct of the evolution of some other characteristic, rather than a direct product of adaptive selection. ==Origin of the term== The term was coined by the Harvard paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould and population geneticist Richard Lewontin in their inf...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spandrel_(biology)

Spandrel

Span'drel noun [ From Span .] 1. (Architecture) The irregular triangular space between the curve of an arch and the inclosing right angle; or the space between the outer moldings of two contiguous arches and a horizontal line above them, or another arch above and inclosing them. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/153

Spandrel

1. A panel between the top of one window and the sill of another window on the story directly above it. 2. An irregular, triangular wall segment adjacent to an arched opening.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22195

Spandrel

1. A panel between the top of one window and the sill of another window on the story directly above it. 2. An irregular, triangular wall segment adjacent to an arched opening.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22196

Spandrel

A flat vertical face in an arcade bounded by the adjacent curves of two arches and the horizontal tangent of their crowns. Or, the vertical face on buildings supported by a skeleton structure between the sill of one window and the top (or lintel) of the window next below.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Spandrel

An area between two adjoining arches, often decorated.
Found on http://www.athenapub.com/14glossary.htm

Spandrel

Area between top of a column or pier and the apex of the arch springing from it.
Found on http://www.castlesontheweb.com/glossary.html

Spandrel

Area between top of a column or pier and the apex of the arch springing from it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20018

spandrel

design in corner of postage stamp
Found on http://phrontistery.info/s.html

Spandrel

in a building fascade, esp. glass, the section covering floor partions.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_architecture

Spandrel

In architecture a spandrel is the triangular spaces included between the arch of a doorway, etc, and a rectangle formed by the outer mouldings over it. The term is also applied to other similar spaces included between arches, etc, and straight-sided figures surrounding them. They are usually ornamented with tracery, foliage, shields, or other enric...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TS.HTM

Spandrel

In architecture, this is the roughly triangular space that is enclosed by the curves of adjacent arches and a horizontal member running between their apexes. It is also the name for the space enclosed by the curve of an arch and an enclosing right angle.
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

spandrel

space between curve of an arch and mouldings
Found on http://phrontistery.info/s.html

spandrel

the almost triangular space between one side of the outer curve of an arch, a wall, and the ceiling or framework. Spandrel Wall: a wall built on the curve of an arch, filling in the spandrel.
Found on http://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/glossary.cfm

Spandrel

The area of wood or stone that lies above an arch or a vault.
Found on http://www.architecture.com/HowWeBuiltBritain/Glossary.xhtml

Spandrel

The area overlying the arch barrel under the road surface (or equivalent), occupied by fill material or voids, or occasionally hidden elements such as internal spandrel walls.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20934

spandrel

the broadly triangular space between the shoulders of an arch and its rectanglular moulding above and at the sides
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

spandrel

The corner space between an arch or circle and a rectangle. Originally an architectural term for the space between one arch and the next in arcading, it is used in the context of carpet and textile patterns. On a clock dial, spandrels refer to the ornamentation in the four corner spaces between the chapter ring and the dial plate. See box above.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-s.html

spandrel

the roughly triangular area above and on either side of an arch, bounded by a line running horizontally through the apex of the arch, a line rising ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/135
No exact match found