Retire

To extinguish a security, as in paying off a debt.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20047

retire

[v] - withdraw from circulation or form the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds 2. [v] - make (someone) retire 3. [v] - withdraw from active participation 4. [v] - go into retirement 5. [v] - dispose of 6. [v] - lose interest 7. [v] - in baseball
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=retire

Retire

Re·tire' transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Retired ; present participle & verbal noun Retiring .] [ French retirer ; prefix re- re- + tirer to draw. See Tirade .] 1. To withdraw; to take...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/67

Retire

Re·tire' intransitive verb 1. To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice. « To Una back he cast him to retire . ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/67

Retire

Re·tire' noun 1. The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires. [ Obsolete] « The battle and the retire of the English succors.» Bacon. « [ Eve] discover'd soon the place of her retire Milton. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/67

retire

verb cause to be out on a fielding play
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=retire

Retire

• (v. i.) To withdraw from a public station, or from business; as, having made a large fortune, he retired. • (v. i.) To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs. • (n.) A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back. • (v. i.) To go back or retu...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/retire/

Retire

To extinguish a security, as in paying off a debt.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosr.htm

Retire

To end a security, extinguish it, or pay off a debt: terminate. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary3364.xhtml

retire

To end the period of life during which one works....
Found on http://www.oenb.at/dictionary/termini.jsp?EINTRAG_ID=11250

Retire

(v) Retire is the action by which a person, entity, or connivance ends it existing activities on conclusion, attainment or by completion. For example a supervisor retires from service. A judge retire from the court room after pronouncing the judgment. A bill of exchange is retired by making payment.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

retire

v. 1) to stop working at one's occupation. 2) to pay off a promissory note and thus "retire" the loan. 3) for a jury to go into the jury room to decide on a verdict after all evi-dence, argument and jury instructions have been completed.
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1841

Retire

A retire is a call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FR.HTM

Retire

To postpone or end one's innings, either voluntarily through boredom when you're simply too good for the opposition, or involuntarily and in agony, when a nasty fast bowler has taken his pound of flesh
Found on http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/239756.html

Retire

To extinguish a security, as in paying off a debt.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22402

Retiré

this is a term from the vocabulary of western classical dance (ballet). It refers to a position of one leg, which is bent so that the point of the foot is close to the knee of the supporting leg. In ballet, it is executed with an outward rotation of the leg. It is very common in pirouettes or as a transitional position.
Found on http://www.contemporary-dance.org/dance-terms.html

retire

(ITIL Service Transition) Permanent removal of an IT service, or other configuration item, from the live environment. Being retired is a stage in the lifecycle of many configuration items.
Found on http://exin.vanharen.net/Player/eKnowledge/itildutchglossary.pdf
No exact match found