port

sweet dark-red dessert wine originally from Portugalan opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing throughthe left side of a ship or aircraft to someone facing the bow or nose(computer science) computer circuit consisting of the hardware and associated circuitry that links one device with another (especially a computer and a hard disk drive or other peripherals)

Port

A port is a location on a coast or shore containing one or more harbors where ships can dock and transfer people or cargo to or from land. Port locations are selected to optimize access to land and navigable water, for commercial demand, and for shelter from wind and waves. Ports with deeper water are rarer, but can handle larger, more economical ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port

Port

The left side of the boat. Towards the left-hand side of the ship facing forward (formerly Larboard). Denoted with a red light at night.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

PORT

Translation of software used on one system to software used on another.
Found on http://classicdoom.com/glossary.htm

port

(1) A seaport. (2) The left side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow.
Found on http://reservationsbvi.com/thisoldpirate/glossary.html

Port

(1) A seaport. (2) The left side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow.
Found on http://sj.sjgames.com/PirateTalk.html

port

(from the article `Transportation`) According to figures released by Lloyd`s Register of Shipping, during 1997 the world fleet of merchant ships grew by 2.8% to 522.2 million gt (gross ... Because the world`s ports mirrored shipping industry trends, there was an increasing need for the large container ports to become hubs that would be ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/96

Port

(NETWORK GLOSSARY) An interface on an internetworking device.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/newworkglossary.html

port

[adj] - on the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft when facing forward 2. [n] - a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country 3. [n] - sweet dark-red dessert wine originally from Portugal 4. [n] - an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing through 5. [v] - transfer...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=port

Port

• (v. t.) To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; -- said of the helm, and used chiefly in the imperative, as a command; as, port your helm. • (n.) A passageway; an opening or entrance to an inclosed place; a gate; a door; a portal. • (v. t.) To carry; to bear; to transport. • (v. t.) To throw, as a musket, diagon...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/port/

port

larboard adjective located on the left side of a ship or aircraft
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=port

port

(computing) In computing, a socket that enables a computer processor to communicate with an external device. It may be an input port (such as a joystick port), or an output port (such as a printer port), or both (an i/o port). Mic...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0033692.html

port

(transport) Point where goods are transferred between water-based and land-based forms of transport. Most ports are coastal, though inland ports on rivers also exist. Ports often have specialized equipment to handle cargo in large quantities (for example, container or roll-on/r...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0034840.html

Port

[circuit theory] In electrical circuit theory, a port is a pair of terminals connecting an electrical network or circuit to an external circuit, a point of entry or exit for electrical energy. A port consists of two nodes (terminals) connected to an outside circuit, that meets the port condition; the currents flowing into the two nodes must...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_(circuit_theory)

Port

[computer networking] In computer networking, a port is an application-specific or process-specific software construct serving as a communications endpoint in a computer`s host operating system. The purpose of ports is to uniquely identify different applications or processes running on a single computer and thereby enable them to share a si...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_(computer_networking)

Port

[medical] In medicine, a port (or portacath) is a small medical appliance that is installed beneath the skin. A catheter connects the port to a vein. Under the skin, the port has a septum through which drugs can be injected and blood samples can be drawn many times, usually with less discomfort for the patient than a more typical `needle st...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_(medical)

Port

Port noun [ From Oporto , in Portugal, i. e., ... porto the port, Latin portus . See Port harbor.] A dark red or purple astringent wine made in Portugal. It contains a large percentage of alcohol.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/130

Port

Port transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Ported ; present participle & verbal noun Porting .] [ French porter , Latin portare to carry. See Port demeanor.] 1. To carry; to bear; to transport. [ Obs...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/130

Port

1) An opening in a speaker case or in a microphone case, just behind the diaphragm.
2) A jack accepting or sending digital data.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Port

3 meanings. First and most generally, a place where information goes into or out of a computer, or both. E.g. the serial port on a personal computer is where a modem would be connected. On the Internet port often refers to a number that is part of a URL, appearing after a colon (:) right after the domain name. Every service on an Internet server li...
Found on http://www.matisse.net/files/glossary.html

Port

A communications connection on an electronic or computer based device
Found on http://www.contractorsunlimited.co.uk/glossary.shtml

Port

A conduit for trasferring information between a computer and an external devide. Examples of these found on most computers are USB ports and serial ports. Some items that can be plugged into these include scanners, printers, joysticks modems and digital cameras.
Found on http://www.majorgeeks.com/glossary.php?id=16

port

A connection for moving data to and from the motherboard.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20581

Port

A connection point for different protocols to communicate on different machines.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20660

Port

A fortified Portuguese wine with an alcoholic strength of more than 16.5%. Brandy is added to the wine part way through the fermentation process. Port is most often served as an after-meal drink.
Found on http://www.nutribase.com/beverage.shtml
No exact match found