Iambic

the meter of the spoken parts in tragedy and old comedy; an iamb consists of two syllables, a short syllable followed by a long syllable.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10135

iambic

[adj] - (prosody) of or consisting of iambs 2. [n] - a verse line consisting of iambs
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=iambic

iambic

In poetry, any verse metre in which the basic unit (the foot) consists of two syllables, the first unstressed, the second stressed. Iambic metre is close to natural speech and is one of the most...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Iambic

I·am'bic adjective [ Latin iambicus , Greek ...: confer French iambique .] 1. (Pros.) Consisting of a short syllable followed by a long one, or of an unaccented syllable followed by an accented; as, an iambic foot. 2. Pertaining to, or composed of, iambics;...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/1

Iambic

I·am'bic noun 1. (Pros.) (a) An iambic foot; an iambus. (b) A verse composed of iambic feet. » The following couplet consists of iambic verses. « Thy gen- - ius calls - thee not - to pur- - chase fame In keen - iam- - bics , but ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/1

iambic

adjective of or consisting of iambs; `iambic pentameter`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=iambic

iambic

noun a verse line consisting of iambs
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=iambic

Iambic

• (n.) An iambic foot; an iambus. • (a.) Pertaining to, or composed of, iambics; as, an iambic verse; iambic meter. See Lambus. • (n.) A verse composed of iambic feet. • (a.) Consisting of a short syllable followed by a long one, or of an unaccented syllable followed by an accented; as, an iambic foot. • (n.) A satirical po...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/iambic/

iambic

In poetry, any verse metre in which the basic unit (the foot) consists of two syllables, the first unstressed, the second stressed. Iambic metre is close to natural speech and is one of the most widely used metres in English verse. The following example is a line from Thomas Gray's poem `Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard` (1751). ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0064226.html

iambic

consisting of iambuses; employing iambuses
Found on http://phrontistery.info/i.html
No exact match found