Gerund

The gerund (d or d) is a non-finite verb form that can function as a noun in Latin and English grammar. The English gerund ends in -ing (as in I enjoy `playing` basketball); the same verb form also serves as the English present participle (which has an adjectival or adverbial function), and as a pure verbal noun. Thus the -ing form in the Englis.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerund

gerund

[n] - a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing` form of an English verb when used as a noun)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=gerund

Gerund

• (n.) A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle. • (n.) A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting purpose or end; -- called also the dative infinitive; as, `Ic haebbe mete to etanne` (I have meat to eat.) In Modern English the name has bee...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/gerund/

gerund

noun a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing` form of an English verb when used as a noun)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Gerund

Ger'und noun [ Latin gerundium , from gerere to bear, carry, perform. See Gest a deed, Jest .] (Lat. Gram.) 1. A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle. 2. (AS. Gram....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/23

gerund

a noun formed from a verb
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1269961

Gerund

Gerund is the name given originally to a part of the Latin verb which possesses the same power of government as a verb, but also resembles a noun in being governed by prepositions. In early English or Anglo-Saxon a dative form of the infinitive is used to indicate purpose, and is often called the gerund. In modern English what seems to be a present...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AG.HTM
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