front

  1. the immediate proximity of someone or something
  2. the side that is forward or prominent
  3. the side that is seen or that goes first
  4. a sphere of activity involving effort
  5. the line along which opposing armies face each other
  6. a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals
  7. (meteorology) the atmospheric phenomenon created at the boundary ......

    front

    (Learning Modules / Geography / Weather forecasting) A zone on the earth's surface representing the junction between two different air masses.

    front

    (from the article `tactics`) Insofar as dispersal took place, it caused fronts to grow much longer and less cohesive. From the middle of the 19th century, this tendency was ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/66

    front

    (weather) the boundary between warm (high pressure) and cold (low pressure) air masses.
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_environmental_science

    front

    [n] - a sphere of activity involving effort 2. [n] - (meteorology) the atmospheric phenomenon created at the boundary between two different air masses 3. [n] - the part of something that is nearest to the normal viewer 4. [n] - the side that is forward or prominent 5. [n] - the outward appearance of a person 6. [n] - the ...
    Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=front

    Front

    • (n.) The most conspicuous part. • (n.) The forehead or brow, the part of the face above the eyes; sometimes, also, the whole face. • (n.) That which covers the foremost part of the head: a front piece of false hair worn by women. • (v. t.) To appear before; to meet. • (n.) A position directly before the face of a person, ...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/front/

    front

    front end noun the side that is forward or prominent
    Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=front

    Front

    [magazine] Front was first published by Cabal Communications in 1998, it was created to rival IPC`s publication Loaded, catering to a demographic of 16- to 25-year-old males. It began as part of the British `lads` mag` genre of magazines though the covers rejects this description with the statement `Front is no lads` mag`. Whilst a major se...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_(magazine)

    Front

    [military formation] A front (фронт, front) is a military formation in some countries. Originating in the Russian Empire, it has been used by the Polish Army, the Red Army and Soviet Army, and by Turkey. It is roughly equivalent to an army group in the military of most other countries. It varies in size but in general contains three to...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_(military_formation)

    Front

    [military] A military front or battlefront is a contested armed frontier between opposing forces. This can be a local or tactical front, or it can range to a theater. A typical front was the Western Front in France and Belgium in World War I. ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_(military)

    Front

    [oceanography] In oceanography, a front is a boundary between two distinct water masses. The water masses are defined by moving in different directions, i.e. on one side of the front the water is generally moving in one way, and on the other side of the front, the water is moving in another. Depending on the directions of the water masses, ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_(oceanography)

    Front

    [weekly] Front was an illustrated weekly newspaper published by the Military Publishing and Press Center (Vojnoizdavački i novinski centar) of the Yugoslav People`s Army. The paper was first published on 25 February 1945. Serving as a reporting tool for the Syrmian Front and other areas of military operations during final phases of the Yug...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_(weekly)

    Front

    Front adjective Of or relating to the front or forward part; having a position in front; foremost; as, a front view.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/80

    Front

    Front noun [ French frant forehead, Latin frons , frontis ; perhaps akin to English brow .] 1. The forehead or brow, the part of the face above the eyes; sometimes, also, the whole face. « Bless'd with his father's front , his mother's tongue.» ...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/80

    Front

    Front transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Fronted ; present participle & verbal noun Fronting .] 1. To oppose face to face; to oppose directly; to meet in a hostile manner. « You four shall front them in th...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/80

    Front

    A line of discontinuity between cold and warm masses of air.
    Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

    Front

    A major discontinuity separating ocean currents and water masses in any combination
    Found on http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/glossary.def.html

    Front

    A major discontinuity separating ocean currents and water masses in any combination
    Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Marine_Biology/

    front

    A thermal wall across which there is a rapid temperature change
    Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/weather/glossary.html

    front

    boundary that defines two separate air masses; where two different air masses collide, sometimes resulting in severe weather changes.
    Found on http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/stars/metgloss.html

    front

    boundary where two air masses with different temperatures and moisture content meet.
    Found on http://www.sercc.com/glossary

    Front

    Front is British slang for cheek, effrontery.
    Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZF.HTM

    front

    front, in meteorology, zone of transition between adjacent air masses. If a cold air mass is advancing to replace a warmer one, their mutual boundary is termed a cold front; if the reverse, then the boundary is termed a warm front, whereas a stationary front indicates that no relative advance of eit...
    Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/weather/A0819774.html

    Front

    In meteorology, generally, the interface or transition zone between two air masses of different density. Since the temperature distribution is the most important regulator of the atmosphere density, a front almost invariably separates air masses of different temperature. When warmer air replaces the colder, it is a warm front, and a front is a cold...
    Found on http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/glossary/front.html

    front

    in meteorology, interface or transition zone between two air masses of different density and temperature; the sporadic flareups of weather along this ... [5 related articles]
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/66
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