fool

  1. a person who lacks good judgment
  2. a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of
  3. a professional clown employed to to entertain a king or nobleman in the middle ages

Fool

• (v. i.) To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth. • (v. t.) To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his money. • (n.) A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly call...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fool/

fool

1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural. ... 2. A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt. ' Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools.' (Milton) ' Experience keeps a dear school, but fool...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

fool

gull verb make a fool or dupe of
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Fool

[stock character] There are several distinct, although overlapping categories of fool as a stock character in creative works (literature, film, etc.) and folklore: simpleton fool, clever fool, and serendipitous fool. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fool_(stock_character)

Fool

Fool intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Fooled ; present participle & verbal noun Fooling .] To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth. « Is this a time for fooling D...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/55

Fool

Fool noun [ Confer French fouler to tread, crush. Confer 1st Foil .] A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry fool .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/55

Fool

Fool transitive verb 1. To infatuate; to make foolish. Shak. « For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit.» Dryden. 2. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/55

fool

a comic entertainer whose madness or imbecility, real or pretended, made him a source of amusement and gave him license to abuse and poke fun at even ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/44

Fool

A fool (from the French foule, meaning mashed or pressed) is a dish comprising a scalded fruit which is then pounded together with cream. Fools, such as gooseberry-fool, are traditionally served in England as a desert or sweet.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QF.HTM

Fool

Cold dessert consisting of pur├łed fruit with whipped cream or custard blended into it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21220

fool

fool 1. Someone who is deficient in judgment, sense, or understanding. 2. A person who acts unwisely on a given occasion: 'He was a fool to have quit his job.' 3. One who has been tricked or made to appear ridiculous; a dupe: 'They made a fool of me by pretending I had won the contest.' 4. Informal, a person with a talent or enthusiasm for a cer...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/843/

fool

fool or court jester,a person who entertains with buffoonery and an often caustic wit. In all countries from ancient times and extending into the 18th cent., mental and physical deformity provided amusement. Attached to noble and royal courts were dwarfs, cripples, idiots, albinos, and freaks. The m...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0819110.html

Fool

Originally a jester-at-court who would entertain the king and nobles, the court jester was often a d
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

fool

[n] - a person who lacks good judgment 2. [v] - make a fool or dupe of
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fool
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