Evidence

a statement made by a witness about something the witness saw or heard that is used to prove or disprove a fact about a case in court - or an object that is presented as part of the statement, e.g., a knife, or fingerprint record

evidence

A written or spoken report or item used in court to prove or disprove a point.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/politics/legalterms.html

Evidence

Evidence, broadly construed, is anything presented in support of an assertion. This support may be strong or weak. The strongest type of evidence is that which provides direct proof of the truth of an assertion. At the other extreme is evidence that is merely consistent with an assertion but does not rule out other, contradictory assertions, as in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence

Evidence

• (v. t.) To render evident or clear; to prove; to evince; as, to evidence a fact, or the guilt of an offender. • (n.) One who bears witness. • (n.) That which is legally submitted to competent tribunal, as a means of ascertaining the truth of any alleged matter of fact under investigation before it; means of making proof; -- the lat...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/evidence/

evidence

(from the article `Christianity`) In addition to this and other work concerning religious language there was a renewal of fundamental discussion of Christian, and more broadly ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/57

Evidence

(Ger. Evidenz) In Husserl: 1. Usual (strict) sense: consciousness of an intended object as itself (more or less fully) given; experience in the broadest sense. Contrasted with empty intending. Perfect evidence is a regulative idea: In any particular evidence the object is also emptily intended as the object of further, confirmative, evidence. Evid....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/e.html

Evidence

(Lat. e+videre, to see) Any supposed fact which is considered as supporting the truth of a given proposition. -- A.C.B.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/e.html

evidence

grounds noun your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief; `the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Evidence

[law] The law of evidence encompasses the rules and legal principles that govern the proof of facts in a legal proceeding. These rules determine what evidence must or must not be considered by the trier of fact in reaching its decision and, sometimes, the weight that may be given to that evidence. The law of evidence is also concerned with ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence_(law)

evidence

[Noun] Anything which gives you a reason to believe something.
Example: All the evidence pointed towards the butler having done it.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Evidence

[policy debate] Evidence in policy debate (sometimes referred to as `cards`) consists mainly of two parts. The cite contains all relevant citation information (that is, the author, date of publication, journal, title, etc.). Although every card should contain a complete citation, only the author`s name and date of publication are typically ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence_(policy_debate)

Evidence

[Proceedings in other Jurisdictions] The Evidence (Proceedings in other Jurisdictions) Act 1975 (c.34) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the long title of which is `An Act to make new provision for enabling the High Court, the Court of Session and the High Court of Justice in Northern Ireland to assist in obtaining evidence...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence_(Proceedings_in_other_Jurisdictions)_

Evidence

[short story] `Evidence` is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. It was first published in the September 1946 issue of Astounding Science Fiction and reprinted in the collections I, Robot (1950), The Complete Robot (1982), and Robot Visions (1990). Many people{Who|date=June 2014} choose to see Asimov`s treatment of technophobia as...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence_(short_story)

Evidence

Ev'i·dence noun [ French évidence , Latin Evidentia . See Evident .] 1. That which makes evident or manifest; that which furnishes, or tends to furnish, proof; any mode of proof; the ground of belief or judgement; as, the evidence of our senses; evidence of...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/77

Evidence

Ev'i·dence transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Evidenced ; p, pr. & verbal noun Evidencing .] To render evident or clear; to prove; to evince; as, to evidence a fact, or the guilt of an offender. Milton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/77

evidence

a form of proof or probative matter legally presented at the trial of an issue by the acts of the parties and through witnesses, records, documents, concrete objects, etc., for the purpose of inducing belief in the minds of the court or the jury
Found on https://www.nycourts.gov/lawlibraries/glossary.shtml

evidence

an indication that makes something apparent
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/934465

evidence

an indication that makes something apparent
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/934465

evidence

an indication that makes something apparent
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1162742

Evidence

Documentary or other material which is used to support a person`s case in a court of law
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

Evidence

Evidence is material that tends to prove or disprove a particular fact or facts. Evidence might be an object or thing, it might be a document or it might be oral testimony from a witness. Whether evidence can be used in a hearing will depend on its admissibility. This may depend on a number of matters and there are many rules of evidence which take...
Found on http://www.fedcourt.gov.au/law-and-practice/legal-research/glossary-of-lega

evidence

evidence, in law, material submitted to a judge or a judicial body to resolve disputed questions of fact. The rules discussed in this article were developed in England for use in jury trials. Today, they are generally observed in all countries having the common law, although they have been extensive...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0817985.html

evidence

Facts, information or objects that indicate whether or not something is true.
Found on http://www.conservancy.co.uk/learn/wordlist.htm

evidence

in law, any of the material items or assertions of fact that may be submitted to a competent tribunal as a means of ascertaining the truth of any ... [12 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/57

evidence

In law, the testimony of witnesses and production of documents and other material in court proceedings, in order to prove or disprove facts at issue in the case. Witnesses must swear or affirm that...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688
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