Epoch

• (n.) A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period. • (n.) An arbitrary fixed date, for which the elements used in computing the place of a planet, or other heavenly body, at any other date, are given; as, the epoch of Mars; lunar elements for the epo...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/epoch/

Epoch

(1) Also known as phase lag. Angular retardation of the maximum of a constituent of the observed tid
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Tides_and_Currents/

epoch

(from the article `time`) ...purposes. Although defining time presents difficulties, measuring it does not; it is the most accurately measured physical quantity. A time ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/38

epoch

noun (astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Epoch

[American magazine] Epoch is a triannual American literary magazine founded in 1947 and published by Cornell University. It has published well-known authors and award-winning work including stories reprinted in The Best American Short Stories series and poems later included in The Best American Poetry series. It publishes fiction, poetry, e...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(American_magazine)

Epoch

[anthology] Epoch is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by Roger Elwood and Robert Silverberg, issued in hardcover by Berkley Putnam in 1975 and in paperback by Berkley in 1977. == Table of contents == Each story has an afterword. Several were nominated for and/or won awards, and the Gregory Benford story was expanded into the n...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(anthology)

Epoch

[astronomy] In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time. These time-varying astronomical quantities might include, for examp...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(astronomy)

EPOCH

[chemotherapy] EPOCH is a quite intensive chemotherapy regimen intended for treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma. It is often combined with Rituximab. In this case it is called R-EPOCH or EPOCH-R. [R]-EPOCH regimen consists of: == Dosing regimen == This regimen requires the use of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent infectious com...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EPOCH_(chemotherapy)

Epoch

[geology] In geochronology, an epoch is a subdivision of the geologic timescale that is longer than an age and shorter than a period. We are currently living in the Holocene Epoch of the Quaternary Period. Rock layers deposited during an epoch are called a series. Series are subdivisions of the stratigraphic column that, like epochs, are su...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(geology)

Epoch

[reference date] In the fields of chronology and periodization, an epoch is an instant in time chosen as the origin of a particular era. The `epoch` then serves as a reference point from which time is measured. Time measurement units are counted from the epoch so that the date and time of events can be specified unambiguously. Events taking...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(reference_date)

Epoch

Ep'och (ĕp'ŏk or ē'pŏk; 277) noun [ Late Latin epocha , Greek 'epochh` check, stop, an epoch of a star, an historical epoch, from 'epe`chein to hold on, check; 'epi` upon + 'e`chein to have, hold; akin to Sanskrit
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/58

epoch

A division of geologic time lasting tens of millions of years. Epochs are subdivisions of geologic periods, often chosen to correspond to a stratigraphic series. Also used for a division of time corresponding to a paleomagnetic interval.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

epoch

A division of geologic time next shorter than a period. Example: the Pleistocene epoch is in the Quaternary period.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

Epoch

A division of geologic time; a subdivision of a period. Example: Pleistocene epoch.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

epoch

a period marked by distinctive character
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1594491

epoch

a period marked by distinctive character
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/149637

epoch

a period of time considered in terms of noteworthy and characteristic events, developments, persons, etc.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/f/frankenstein/study-help/full-gloss

Epoch

A subdivision of geologic time that is longer than an age but shorter than a period. The Tertiary Pe
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22392

EPOCH

acronym: European Programme on Climate and Hazards (EEC)
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/acronyms.html#E

EPOCH

An abbreviation for a chemotherapy combination used to treat aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including mantle cell lymphoma. It includes the drugs etoposide phosphate, prednisone, vincristine sulfate (Oncovin), cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (hydroxydaunorubicin). Also called EPOCH regimen.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=E

Epoch

An epoch is a division of a geologic period; it is the smallest division of geologic time, lasting several million years.
Found on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/

Epoch

An epoch, or era, is a fixed point of time, commonly selected on account of some remarkable event by which it has been distinguished, and which is made the beginning or determining point of a particular year from which all other years, whether preceding or ensuing, are computed. In the Christian countries, the creation and the birth of Christ are t...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AE.HTM

Epoch

An instant in time for which the positions of celestial objects are given.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448

Epoch

An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference, e.g. for a set of orbital elements.
Found on http://www.braeunig.us/space/glossary.htm

epoch

An interval of geologic time; a division of a period. (Example: Pleistocene Epoch).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22047
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