Courier

A courier is a person who delivers messages, packages, and mail. ==Duties and functions== Couriers are distinguished from ordinary mail services by features such as speed, security, tracking, signature, specialization and individualization of express services, and swift delivery times, which are optional for most everyday mail services. As a premi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courier

Courier

• (n.) A messenger sent with haste to convey letters or dispatches, usually on public business. • (n.) An attendant on travelers, whose business it is to make arrangements for their convenience at hotels and on the way.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/courier/

Courier

[automobile] The Courier was a brass era manufactured by Sandusky Automobile Company in Sandusky, Ohio in 1904 and 1905. The 1904 Courier was a runabout model. It could seat 2 passengers and sold for US$650, making it one of the lowest-priced cars on the market at the time. The flat-mounted single-cylinder engine, situated at the center of ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courier_(automobile)

Courier

[Quarterly] The Courier was a magazine published in Britain during the period 1938-1951, by Norman Kark Publications, Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square, London. It was printed mainly on art paper and continued to be produced throughout World War II, in spite of the paper restrictions imposed. Each issue included approximately 180 pages, 7½...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courier_(Quarterly)

Courier

[typeface] Courier is a monospaced slab serif typeface designed to resemble the output from a strike-on typewriter. The typeface was designed by Howard `Bud` Kettler in 1955, and it was later redrawn by Adrian Frutiger for the IBM Selectric Composer series of electric typewriters. Although the design of the original Courier typeface was com...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courier_(typeface)

Courier

Cou'ri·er noun [ French courrier , from courre , courir , to run, Latin currere . See Course , Current .] 1. A messenger sent with haste to convey letters or dispatches, usually on public business. « The wary Bassa . . . by speedy couriers...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/174

Courier

A messenger, A term used mostly by traders.
Found on http://www.xmission.com/~drudy/amm/gloss.html

Courier

A person who carries and delivers messages, documents, packages, etc., often between companies. A person employed by a travel company as a tourist guide
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22643

courier

a traveler's paid attendant, traveling ahead to make arrangements. Dickens employs a French courier for his travels in Pictures from Italy.
Found on http://charlesdickenspage.com/glossary.html

Courier

A United States Army experimental communications satellite. The objective of the Courier program was to develop a satellite of higher capacity and longer life than SCORE, which could be used for communication tests and assessments of traffic handling techniques. The concept was similar to SCORE in t...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/Courier.html

Courier

Courier: In the drug trade, someone who internally conceals and transports an illicit drug. Also called a body packer. See: Body packer.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=25918

Courier

HMS Courier was a British Algerine Class minesweeper of 950 tons displacement launched in 1943. HMS Courier was powered by two 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 16.5 knots. She carried a peacetime complement of 85 and between 104 and 138 in war. For defence she was armed with one 4-inch dual-purpose gun; four 40 mm anti-aircraft guns and...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RCA.HTM

Courier

In architecture, a courier is a continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TC.HTM

courier

Type: Term Synonyms: body packer
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=20986
No exact match found