Core

The Core of the board is usually formed from vertically laminated wood stringers. The core aids' dampening flex and helps direct energy from the bindings.

CORE

The centre, light guiding part of an optical fibre. The refractive index is higher than that of the cladding, to ensure propagation of optical signals.

core

n: a cylindrical sample taken from a formation for geological analysis. Usually a conventional core barrel is substituted for the bit and procures a sample as it penetrates the formation. v: to obtain a formation sample for analysis.

Core

[economics] ==Summary == Badge of Medelpads Fotbollförbund as found on the Medelpads Fotbollförbund Official website. Available at http://medelpad.svenskfotboll.se/. ===Fair-use rationale=== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_(economics)

Core

[manufacturing] A core is a device used in casting and molding processes to produce internal cavities and reentrant angles. The core is normally a disposable item that is destroyed to get it out of the piece. They are most commonly used in sand casting, but are also used in injection molding. An intriguing example of the use of cores is in ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_(manufacturing)

Core

To remove the inedible center of fruits such apples and pears.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21216

Core

Core is computer slang for main storage or RAM. It Dates from the days of ferrite-core memory and is now archaic as techspeak in most places outside IBM, but is also still used in the UNIX community and by old-time hackers or those who would sound like them.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZCA.HTM

Core

The USS Core was an American light fleet aircraft carrier of 7800 tons displacement converted from a mercantile hull and launched in 1942. The USS Core was powered by Foster Wheeler type boilers providing a top speed of 16 knots and carried a complement of 650 and 21 aircraft. She was armed with one 5 inch gun; sixteen 40 mm Bofors anti-aircraft gu...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RCA.HTM

Core

The central inedible part of a fruit which contains the seeds or pips. To remove the central inedible part of a fruit, for best results use an apple corer to core smaller fruit.
Found on http://www.wrenscottage.com/kitchen/glossary.php

CORE

[Brazil] Coordenadoria de Recursos Especiais (Portuguese for Coordination of Special Assets), mostly known by its acronym CORE, is a national special police unit within the Civil Police, which originated from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. CORE was formed in July 4, 1969, and is comparable to São Paulo`s GOE. ==Duties== ==Services== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CORE_(Brazil)

CORE

[advertising media] Core is an advertising agency founded in St. Louis, Missouri in 1995 by Marc Kempter. Core has three major divisions: a full-service advertising agency; Core Audiovisual; Core Content. Core was named in Graphis Inc. Magazine’s `Top 10 Creative Agencies” and by Advertising Age magazine as `One to Watch.” Core was al...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CORE_(advertising_media)

Core

The central part of a nuclear reactor containing the fuel elements and any moderator.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary029.htm

core

That portion of the interior of the Earth that lies beneath the mantle, and goes all of the way to the center. The Earth's core is very dense, rich in iron and the source of the magnetic field.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

Core

The uranium-containing heart of a nuclear reactor, where energy is released.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Core

(1) A cylindrical sample extracted from a BEACH or seabed to investigate the types and DEPTHS of sediment layers. (2) An inner, often much less permeable portion of a BREAKWATER, or BARRIER BEACH.
Found on http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/swces/products/glossary.htm

Core

The Earth's central region, believed to be composed mostly of iron. The core has a radius of 3,477 kilometers and is surrounded by the Earth's mantle. At the center of the molten outer core is a solid inner core with a radius of 1,213 kilometers.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20129

Core

The central portion of the Earth, at a depth of approximately 2900 km. The core has a molten metallic composition.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20130

core

[Noun] Central or most important part.
Example: As captain, David Beckham is the core of the English football team.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

core

[n] - a cylindrical sample of soil or rock obtained with a hollow drill 2. [n] - the central part of the earth 3. [n] - the center of an object 4. [n] - a small group of indispensable persons or things 5. [n] - the chamber of a nuclear reactor containing the fissile material where the reaction takes place 6. [n] - a bar o...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=core

CORE

(In topic `Tools, Methods & Processes`) CORE (COntrolled Requirements Expression) is Vitech`s system engineering/architecting tool
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20477

Core

A convex feature on either side of the mould that will enter an opposing cavity when the mould is closed. The void between the cavity and core is where the resin solidifies and forms the part. Often the B-side of a mould is referred to as the core side, and in the case of a part like a drinking cup, the entire B-side will be a core
Found on http://www.protomold.co.uk/Glossary.xhtml

CORE

Acronym for Congress of Racial Equality, US nonviolent civil-rights organization. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

core

In archaeology, a solid cylinder of sediment or soil collected with a coring device and used to evaluate the geological context and stratigraphy of archaeological material or to obtain...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Core

A vertical element in a building containing lifts, stairs, ducts or risers.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20698

Core

The central part of a nuclear reactor containing the fuel elements and any moderator
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20725
No exact match found