bill

  1. a statute in draft before it becomes law
  2. a statement of money owed for goods or services
  3. a piece of paper money (especially one issued by a central bank)
  4. the entertainment offered at a public presentation
  5. an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution
  6. horny projecting mouth of a bird
  7. a sign posted in a public place as an advert......

    Bill

    Bill is slang for the nose
    Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZB.HTM

    bill

    [Verb] To put on posters to advertise.
    Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

    bill

    [n] - a piece of paper money (especially one issued by a central bank) 2. [n] - a statute in draft before it becomes law 3. [n] - a statement of money owed for goods or services 4. [n] - a list of particulars (as a playbill or bill of fare) 5. [n] - a long-handled saw with a curved blade 6. [n] - a brim that projects to t...
    Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bill

    Bill

    (US Currency and Slang) - Paper currency. eg. A dollar bill. Sometimes means a 100 dollar bill.
    Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm

    Bill

    The draft form of an Act submitted by government for consideration in the Houses of Parliament prior to becoming legislation. PDF files are received from PBO of the originating House for production. Prints on Azure stock.
    Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

    Bill

    A draft of a proposed law presented to Parliament. Once agreed by Parliament and given Royal Assent by the ruling monarch, Bills become law and are known as Acts.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20760

    Bill

    Series of anti-tank missiles [SW]
    Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

    Bill

    Bill noun [ Middle English bile , bille , Anglo-Saxon bile beak of a bird, proboscis; confer Ir. & Gael. bil , bile , mouth, lip, bird's bill. Confer Bill a weapon.] A beak, as of a bird, or sometimes of a turtle or other animal. Milton.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/51

    Bill

    Bill intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Billed ; present participle & verbal noun Billing .] 1. To strike; to peck. [ Obsolete] 2. To join bills, as doves; to caress in fondness. 'As pigeons bill .'
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/51

    Bill

    Bill transitive verb To work upon ( as to dig, hoe, hack, or chop anything) with a bill.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/51

    bill

    peak noun a brim that projects to the front to shade the eyes; `he pulled down the bill of his cap and trudged ahead`
    Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bill

    bill

    noun a long-handled saw with a curved blade; `he used a bill to prune branches off of the tree`
    Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bill

    Bill

    • (v. t.) To advertise by a bill or public notice. • (v. i.) To join bills, as doves; to caress in fondness. • (n.) A weapon of infantry, in the 14th and 15th centuries. A common form of bill consisted of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, having a short pike at the back and another at the top, and attached to the end o...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bill/

    Bill

    A debt instrument with an original life of less than one year. Usually issued at a discount, and redeemed at par. Ex. T-bills. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
    Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary267.xhtml

    Bill

    Type: Term Pronunciation: bil Definitions: 1. Arthur H., U.S. obstetrician, 1877-1961. See: Bill maneuver
    Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=10211

    Bill

    [Show Boat] `Bill` is a song heard in Act II of Kern and Hammerstein`s classic 1927 musical Show Boat. The song was written for Kern and P.G. Wodehouse`s 1917 musical Oh, Lady! Lady!! for Vivienne Segal to perform, but withdrawn because it was considered too melancholy for that show. However, when Kern and Hammerstein were at work on the se...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_(Show_Boat)

    BILL

    Type: Term Definitions: 1. Abbreviation for bass increase at low levels, under level.
    Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=10210

    bill

    Bond maturing in less than one year (generally refers to the government`s Treasury Bills)....
    Found on http://www.oenb.at/dictionary/termini.jsp?EINTRAG_ID=332

    Bill

    A pole weapon with a large chopping head, and often with a hook and backspike. Characteristically used by English infantry.
    Found on http://web.ceu.hu/medstud/manual/SRM/gloss.htm

    bill

    A piece of legislation under consideration by a legislative body.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21177

    Bill

    A proposed law presented for approval to a legislative body.
    Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/b030.htm

    Bill

    (n) Bill is the statement or document containing the details of an expected action to be followed as the covenant of the statement or document. Eg. 1. A signed check to pay the amount said in the check to the person named in the document.2. Bill of exchange 3. Bill containing the provisions of the proposed law
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

    Bill

    A bill was a species of halberd, consisting of a broad blade, with the cutting part hooked like a woodsman's bill-hook, and with a spike both at the back and at the top. It was mounted on a staff about six feet long, and was known as a 'black bill' from the colour of the varnish used to protect it from rust, and was largely used by infantry soldier...
    Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FB.HTM

    bill

    In birds, the projection of the skull bones covered with a horny sheath. It is not normally sensitive, except in some aquatic birds, rooks, and woodpeckers, where the bill is used to locate food that is not visible. The bills of birds are adapted by shape and size to specific diets, for example, shov...
    Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0048980.html
    No exact match found