cycle

several movements intended to be performed together; often refers to a setting of the five movements of the mass ordinary (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, and Agnus dei). Movements in a cycle are connected by mode, voicing, musical material and/or musical technique.
Found on http://people.vanderbilt.edu/~cynthia.cyrus/ORB/orbgloss.htm

Cycle

a ring or turn, from the Greek Kuklos; more properly a spiral; a day and night are a cycle; a year is another. The returning again of any time or any impression. The subject of cycles is of the greatest importance, as it includes all history and all evolution. The best known large cycle is the sidereal, a little over 25,000 years.
Found on http://blavatskyblogger.freeukisp.co.uk/quickblast%20W%20Q%20Judge%20Theoso

Cycle

Economies go through periods of expansion and contraction called cycles. A typical market cycle would start with a period of low economic activity and low confidence, causing inflation and interest rates to fall. These low interest rates stimulate economic activity. As the economy improves, company earnings rise, giving an impetus to share prices.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20211

cycle

[n] - an interval during which a recurring sequence of events occurs 2. [n] - a series of poems or songs on the same theme 3. [n] - a periodically repeated sequence of events 4. [n] - a single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon 5. [n] - a shortened version of `bicycle` or `tricycle` or `motorcycle` 6. [v
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=cycle

Cycle

1) An alternation of a waveform which begins at a point, passes through the zero line, and ends at a point with the same value and moving in the same direction as the starting point.
2) On a Solid State Logic Console, a command to have the console computer control the tape machine to play and replay a certain section of the tape.
Found on http://www.testing1212.co.uk/a.htm

cycle

any repeatedly looped animation e.g using drawings 1,3,5,7,1,3,5,7  etc.
Found on http://www.animationpost.co.uk/doping/glossary.htm

Cycle

A complete cycle of a wave is equivalent to one complete wavelength of that wave. The time taken to produce one complete cycle is called the period of the wave. The number of cycles per second is called the frequency of the wave
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Cycle

One complete vibration of a sound source or its electrical equivalent. One cycle per second is expressed as 1Hertz (Hz).
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Cycle

a series of related musical structures, e.g. the circle of fifths or cycle of keys
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Cycle

One complete repetition of a periodic motion. It may start anywhere in the motion. See also: Frequency, Period, Periodic.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/c/y/cycle/source.html

Cycle

A single charge and discharge of a battery.
Found on http://www.mpoweruk.com/glossary.htm

cycle

A system which uses feedback to input extra data.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Cycle

Cy'cle noun [ French ycle , Late Latin cyclus , from Greek ky`klos ring or circle, cycle; akin to Sanskrit cakra wheel, circle. See Wheel .] 1. An imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens; one of the celestial spheres. Milton. 2. An inte
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/209

Cycle

Cy'cle intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Cycled . (-k'ld); present participle & verbal noun Cycling (-kl...ng).] 1. To pass through a cycle of changes; to recur in cycles. Tennyson. Darwin. 2. To rid
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/209

Cycle

Cy'cle noun (a) (Thermodynamics) A series of operations in which heat is imparted to (or taken away from) a working substance which by its expansion gives up a part of its internal energy in the form of mechanical work (or being compressed increases its internal energy) and is again brought
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/209

cycle

A round or succession of observable phenomena, recurring usually at regular intervals and in the same sequence. ... Origin: Gr. Kyklos = circle ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?cycle

cycle

noun a series of poems or songs on the same theme; `Schubert`s song cycles`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cycle

cycle

rhythm noun an interval during which a recurring sequence of events occurs; `the never-ending cycle of the seasons`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cycle

cycle

verb recur in repeating sequences
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cycle

cycle

(si´kәl) a succession or recurring series of events.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Cycle

• (n.) A bicycle or tricycle, or other light velocipede. • (n.) One entire round in a circle or a spire; as, a cycle or set of leaves. • (n.) An imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens; one of the celestial spheres. • (n.) An orderly list for a given time; a calendar. • (n.) An age; a long period of time. • (v. i.) To
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cycle/

cycle

(from the article `combinatorics`) ..., the edges being evident by context. The chain is closed if 0 = and open otherwise. If the chain is closed, it is called a cycle, provided its ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/173

cycle

in literature, a group of prose or poetic narratives, usually of different authorship, centring on a legendary hero and his associates. The term ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/173

cycle

(Gr. kyklos circle) a round or succession of observable phenomena, recurring usually at regular intervals and in the same sequence.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio22.html

Cycle

[magazine] Cycle Magazine was an American motorcycling enthusiast magazine, published from the early 1950s through the early 1990s. During its heyday, in the 1970s and 1980s, it had a circulation of more than 500,000 and was headquartered in Westlake Village, California, near the canyon roads of the Santa Monica Mountains, where Cycle`s edi
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_(magazine)
No exact match found