Wey

• (n.) Way; road; path. • (v. t. & i.) To weigh. • (n.) A certain measure of weight.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/wey/

Wey

[unit] A wey is a unit of mass used in England since before 900 CE. The value of a wey has varied over time though was originally used to denote 2 hundredweight or 256 pounds. It has also been used as a unit of volume for dry commodities, denoting roughly 40 bushels. The word is derived from the Old English wæge, meaning weight. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wey_(unit)

Wey

Wey noun Way; road; path. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/26

Wey

Wey transitive verb & i. To weigh. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/26

wey

a historic English unit. The word comes from the old English wæge, meaning weight, and originally the wey was a weight unit representing about two hundredweight. Later it came to be used as a volume unit for a variety of dry commodities. Its size varied. Roughly speaking, the wey represented about 40 bushels, 2 cubic yards, or 1.5 cubic meter...
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictW.html

Wey

Ancient Measurement Terms: Weight or volume. See: Cart-load. About 19½ hundredweight, dependent upon material. Also, 320 gallons, or 40 bushels, or 30 fotmal.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

wey

old measure for dry goods usually equal to 40 bushels
Found on http://phrontistery.info/w.html
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