Vowel

a phoneme produced without audible friction or closure. Every syllable contains a vowel. A vowel phoneme may be represented by one or more letters. These may be vowels (maid, or a combination of vowels and consonants (start; could).
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Vowel

In phonetics, a vowel is a sound in spoken language, such as an English ah! [ɑː] or oh! [əʊ], pronounced with an open vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure at any point above the glottis. This contrasts with consonants, such as English sh! [ʃː], there is a constriction or closure at some point along the vocal tract. A vowe...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel

vowel

[n] - a letter of the alphabet standing for a spoken vowel 2. [n] - a speech sound made with the vocal tract open
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=vowel

Vowel

• (a.) Of or pertaining to a vowel; vocal. • (n.) A vocal, or sometimes a whispered, sound modified by resonance in the oral passage, the peculiar resonance in each case giving to each several vowel its distinctive character or quality as a sound of speech; -- distinguished from a consonant in that the latter, whether made with or without...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/vowel/

vowel

vowel sound noun a speech sound made with the vocal tract open
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vowel

Vowel

Vow'el adjective Of or pertaining to a vowel; vocal.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/37

Vowel

Vow'el noun [ French voyelle , or an Old French form without y , Latin vocalis (sc. littera ), from vocalis sounding, from vox , vocis , a voice, sound. See Vocal .] (Phon.) A vocal, or sometimes a whispered, sound modified by resonance...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/37

Vowel

A sound in spoken language characterized by an open configuration of the voice tract sthat there is nbuild-up of air pressure above the vocal cords. The Roman vowels include the letters “a”, “e”, “i”, “o”, “u” and sometimes “y”. In all languages, vowels form the nucleus of a syllable. A vowel alscompletes a syllable.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary082.htm

vowel

a sound that you make when you speak without closing your mouth or throat
Found on http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/features/glossary/dictionary-terms/

vowel

in human speech, sound in which the flow of air from the lungs passes through the mouth, which functions as a resonance chamber, with minimal ... [34 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/v/37

vowel

In speech, a voiced sound without friction. In the English alphabet the vowels are a, e, i, o, and u; y can represent either a vowel or a semivowel; all other letters are consonants
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038763.html

vowel

In terms of sound production, a vowel is a single speech sound produced by vibrating the VOCAL CORDS and not obstructing the mouth in any way, as in the // of bank, shaped by the position of the lips into rounded and unrounded sounds as in English /i:/ bee and /u:/ boo, and by the position of the tongue into OPEN/CLOSE as in English /u:/ loot vs //...
Found on http://www.viviancook.uk/Linguistics/LinguisticsGlossary.htm

Vowel

the open sounds made in speech - as (mainly) distinct from consonants
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/eng.htm

vowel

vowel 1. A speech sound made with the vocal tract open. 2. A speech sound produced by the passage of air through the vocal tract, with relatively little obstruction. 3. A letter of the alphabet that represents a spoken vowel. In English, the vowels are 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u', and sometimes 'y'. ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2320/7
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