Syllable

A syllable (from the Greek συλλαβή, syn = `co, together` + labe = `grasp`, thus meaning a handful [of letters]) is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds. For example, the word water is composed of two syllables: wa and ter. A syllable is typically made up of a syllable nucleus (most often a vowel) with optional initial ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syllable

syllable

a word or part of a word that has only one vowel sound
Found on http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/features/glossary/dictionary-terms/

Syllable

Each beat in a word is a syllable. Words with only one beat (cat, fright, jail) are called monosyllabic; words with more than one beat (super, coward, superficiality) are polysyllabic.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

syllable

Plural form: syllables. Chunks of sound which have a separate sound when they are said. A syllable can be a word, part of a word, just one letter or a group of letters.
Example: The word 'Internet' has 3 syllables. In - ter - net.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Syllable

• (n.) An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the li...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/syllable/

syllable

noun a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme; `the word `pocket` has two syllables`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Syllable

Syl'la·ble noun [ Middle English sillable , Old French sillabe , French syllabe , Latin syllaba , Greek ... that which is held together, several letters taken together so as to form one sound, a syllable, from ... to take together; ... with + ... to take; confer Sanskrit ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/262

Syllable

Syl'la·ble transitive verb To pronounce the syllables of; to utter; to articulate. Milton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/262

syllable

A group of letters that usually contains a vowel and can be pronounced independently from the complete word.
Found on http://quick-facts.co.uk/language/grammar.html

Syllable

A part of a word that contains a vowel or, in spoken language, a vowel sound (e-vent, news-pa-per).
Found on http://www.ldonline.org/glossary

Syllable

A part of a word that contains a vowel or, in spoken language, a vowel sound (e-vent, news-pa-per)
Found on http://www.ldonline.org/glossary

syllable

a segment of speech that consists of a vowel, with or without one or more accompanying consonant sounds immediately preceding or following—for ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/198

syllable

A sound structure usually consisting of a central VOWEL (V) such as /a:/, with one or more CONSONANTS (C) preceding or following it, such as /b/ or /k/ CV /ba:/ bar and VC /a:k/ ark. Languages vary in whether they permit only CV syllables or allow CVC syllables as well and in the combinations of C that may be used. See EPENTHESIS
Found on http://www.viviancook.uk/Linguistics/LinguisticsGlossary.htm

Syllable

A unit of pronunciation making up a word. For example, the word 'badger' consists of two syllables 'bad' and 'ger'. In English, syllables can be defined as either stressed (long) or unstressed (short). See meter.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

syllable

a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

syllable

a vowel preceded by from zero to three consonants ('awl' ... 'strand'), and followed by from zero to four consonants ('too' ... 'sixths').
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Syllable

A vowel preceded by from zero to three consonants ('awl' ... 'strand'), and followed by from zero to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

syllable

The most important structural unit in phonology. A syllable consists of a series of sounds which are grouped around a nucleus of acoustic prominence (usually a vowel). A closed syllable is one which has a coda, an open syllable has a codaless rhyme: got /gɒt/ versus go /gəʊ/.
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html

syllable

Unit of pronunciation within a word, or as a monosyllabic word, made by a vowel or a combination of vowels and consonants. For example, the word `competition` contains four syllables: `com/pe/ti/tion`
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038757.html

syllable

[n] - a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=syllable
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