Key

A signal to move on to the next step in a skydive
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20082

KeY

The KeY tool is used in formal verification of Java programs. It accepts both specifications written in JML or OCL to Java source files. These are transformed into theorems of dynamic logic and then compared against program semantics which are likewise defined in terms of dynamic logic. KeY is significantly powerful in that it supports both intera...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeY

Key

The pitch reference for A diatonic scale
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Key

• (n.) An indehiscent, one-seeded fruit furnished with a wing, as the fruit of the ash and maple; a samara; -- called also key fruit. • (n.) That part of a mechanism which serves to lock up, make fast, or adjust to position. • (n.) That part of the plastering which is forced through between the laths and holds the rest in place. &bul...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/key/

key

(from the article `chess`) ...also distinguished from studies by their general lack of resemblance to positions that typically arise in games. Strategy and general principles ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

key

(from the article `data encryption`) Computers encrypt data by applying an algorithm—i.e., a set of procedures or instructions for performing a specified task—to a block of data. A ... ...is an apparently incomprehensible binary stream of 1s and 0s, as in computer output, is referred to as the plaintext. As noted above, the se...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

key

(from the article `information processing`) In any collection, physical objects are related by order. The ordering may be random or according to some characteristic called a key. Such ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

key

(from the article `keyboard instrument`) ...instead of keys as late as the 1440s, but a keyboard resembling the modern type existed in the 14th century, although the arrangement of naturals ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

key

(from the article `taxonomy`) ...namely, identifying and making natural groups. The specimen or a group of similar specimens must be compared with descriptions of what is already ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

key

(from the article `wind instrument`) ...because there was no hole to cover below the fundamental, d. Consequently, a seventh hole was bored between the sixth and the end of the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/25

Key

(In topic `Security`) A key is a string of bits used widely in cryptography to enable the encryption & decryption of data
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20477

Key

1. The screw that controls ink flow from the ink fountain of a printing press.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

key

key out verb identify as in botany or biology, for example
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

key

tonality noun any of 24 major or minor diatonic scales that provide the tonal framework for a piece of music
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

key

(music) In music, describes any piece where the melodies and harmonies are based on the notes of a major or minor scale. For example, a piece in the key of C major uses mainly the notes of the C major scale, and the harmonies are made up of the notes of that scale. The first note of a scale is...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019032.html

Key

[basketball] The key, in all games, starting with FIBA`s amendments to its rules in 2010 (to be first implemented after the 2010 FIBA World Championship), is rectangular. Prior to 2006, the key in FIBA-sanctioned tournaments (mostly basketball played outside the United States, and almost all international tournaments including the World Cha...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(basketball)

Key

[cryptography] In cryptography, a key is a piece of information (a parameter) that determines the functional output of a cryptographic algorithm or cipher. Without a key, the algorithm would produce no useful result. In encryption, a key specifies the particular transformation of plaintext into ciphertext, or vice versa during decryption. K...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(cryptography)

Key

[database] Musicals where the songs are all part of the Soul Music genre ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(database)

Key

[engineering] In mechanical engineering, a key is a machine element used to connect a rotating machine element to a shaft. The key prevents relative rotation between the two parts and may enable torque transmission. For a key to function, the shaft and rotating machine element must have a keyway and a keyseat, which is a slot and pocket in ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(engineering)

Key

[instrument] A key is a specific part of a musical instrument. The purpose and function of the part in question depends on the instrument. On instruments equipped with tuning machines, violins and guitars, for example, a key is part of a tuning machine. It is a worm gear with a key shaped end used to turn a cog, which, in turn, is attached ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(instrument)

Key

[lock] A key is a device that is used to operate a lock. A typical key is a small piece of metal consisting of two parts: the blade, which slides into the keyway of the lock and distinguishes between different keys, and the bow, which is left protruding so that torque can be applied by the user. A key is usually intended to operate one spec...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(lock)

Key

[music] In music theory, the key of a piece is the tonic note and chord, which gives a subjective sense of arrival and rest. Other notes and chords in the piece create varying degrees of tension, resolved when the tonic note and/or chord returns. The key may be major or minor, although major is assumed in a phrase like `this piece is in C.`...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(music)

Key

Key (kē) noun [ Middle English keye , key , kay , Anglo-Saxon cæg .] 1. An instrument by means of which the bolt of a lock is shot or drawn; usually, a removable metal instrument fitted to the mechanism of a particular lock and operated by turning in its plac...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/7

Key

Key noun (Teleg.) A metallic lever by which the circuit of the sending or transmitting part of a station equipment may be easily and rapidly opened and closed; any device for closing or opening an electric circuit.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/7

Key

Key transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Keved ; present participle & verbal noun Keying .] To fasten or secure firmly; to fasten or tighten with keys or wedges. Francis. To key up . (a) (Architecture)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/7
No exact match found