detent

See escapement.

Detent

A detent is a device used to mechanically resist or arrest the rotation of a wheel, axle, or spindle. Such a device can be anything ranging from a simple metal pin to a machine. The term is also used for the method involved. Detents are for example used to simply arrest rotation in one direction or to intentionally divide a rotation into discrete ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detent

Detent

• (n.) That which locks or unlocks a movement; a catch, pawl, or dog; especially, in clockwork, the catch which locks and unlocks the wheelwork in striking.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/detent/

Detent

De·tent' noun [ French détente , from détendre to unbend, relax; prefix dé- (L. dis- or de ) + tendre to stretch. See Distend .] (Mech.) That which locks or unlocks a movement; a catch, pawl, or dog; especially, in clockwork, the catch whic...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/50

Detent

a click stop in the shutter release button, a place where the mechanism is designed to register specific information such as exposure or focus before the button is fully depressed.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

Detent

A stop or catch. In electronics usually placed in a variable resistor such as a the middle point of a 'pan' control on a mixing desk, to tell you where the 'default' setting is. Physical click stop in the center of a control surface such as a pan or EQ cut/boost knob.
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Detent

In an escapement, a separate component between the balance and the escape-wheel which performs the locking function, so that the balance itself does not have its freedom of movement impaired by the need to do this.   The detent may revolve (pivoted detent) or it may consist of an arrangement of flat
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20450

Detent

Physical click stop in the center of a control surface such as a pan or EQ cut/boost knob
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20532
No exact match found