abdicate

[Verb] To give up being a king or queen.
Example: The public was sad when the King abdicated.
See also: abdication
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

abdicate

[v] - give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, or duties and obligations
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=abdicate

Abdicate

Ab'di·cate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Abdicated ; present participle & verbal noun Abdicating .] [ Latin abdicatus , past participle of abdicare ; ab + dicare to proclaim, akin to dice...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/3

Abdicate

Ab'di·cate intransitive verb To relinquish or renounce a throne, or other high office or dignity. « Though a king may abdicate for his own person, he cannot abdicate for the monarchy. Burke. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/3

abdicate

verb give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, or duties and obligations; `The King abdicated when he married a divorcee`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=abdicate

Abdicate

• (v. t.) To surrender or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw definitely from filling or exercising, as a high office, station, dignity; as, to abdicate the throne, the crown, the papacy. • (v. t.) To renounce; to relinquish; -- said of authority, a trust, duty, right, etc. • (v. t.) To reject; to cast off. • (v. t.) To ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/abdicate/

abdicate

abdicate 1. To proclaim or declare to be no longer one's own, to disclaim, disown, cast off; especially, to disown or disinherit children. Now only as a technical term of Roman Law (Latin abdicare filium, also abdicare patrem). 2. To formally give up (a right, trust, office, or dignity); to renounce, lay down, surrender, abandon; at first implying ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2357/

Abdicate

Abdicate means to renounce one's thrown.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AA.HTM
No exact match found