Copy of `Earth Electrical - Glossary of electric terms`

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Earth Electrical - Glossary of electric terms
Category: Sciences > Electrics and electronics
Date & country: 28/03/2011, UK
Words: 12


Bonding
This is the yellow and green cable, which connects your incoming services (water, gas, etc) to the earth block to prevent the metal pipes becoming "live".

Consumer unit
Also known as the fuse box, this is the box (normally in the cellar or a cupboard near to your meter) where the fuses or circuit breakers are.

Equipotential Bonding
The yellow and green cable, which is sometimes used to connect exposed metalwork and/or electrical fittings together. Used in special locations like bathrooms.

Flush fitting
This means that switches or sockets are fixed into the plaster or brickwork. It's a better job when finished but may require some plastering and/or redecorating.

MCB
Miniature circuit breaker, these are the switches (or fuses) protecting each circuit.

Part P
A section of the building regulations that requires most domestic electrical work to be notified to the local authorities, this should be done on your behalf by any reputable electrician - when in doubt ask for a certificate. Liability rests with the consumer to ensure you comply!!

PAT testing
Portable appliances (almost anything with a plug) in the work place should be tested at regular intervals and marked with a sticker to show they are safe.

Radial
A way of wiring electrical points which, unlike a ring circuit does not return to the point of supply.

RCD
Residual current device, this is a safety device covering some or all of the circuits in your home, it monitors your system and will disconnect all the circuits it covers if it detects a fault.

Ring circuit
This is a common way to wire sockets. A supply is taken to the first electrical point, (usually sockets) then each point should be linked to the next and finally back to the point of supply (normally the consumer unit). Additional sockets taken from the ring are called spurs.

Spur
An addition or "branch" to a ring circuit.

Surface mounted
Sometimes the sockets and switches are fixed to a plastic or metal backbox rather than buried in the brickwork, this often means a quicker, and therefore cheaper job with a lot less mess.