predicate

A logical expression which evaluates to TRUE or FALSE, normally to direct the execution path in code.
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predicate

[n] - (logic) what is predicated of the subject of a proposition 2. [n] - one of the two main constituents of a sentence 3. [v] - make the (grammatical) predicate in a proposition 4. [v] - affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of
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Predicate

The predicate is all that is written or said in a sentence or clause about its grammatical subject, e.g. The young choir boy [subject] sang every song in the book [predicate].…
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predicate

traditional and modern grammars often divide sentences so that constituents other than the subject are considered together to form the predicate (e.g. John ( subject ) kicked the ball ( predicate )).
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Predicate

The predicate is that part of a sentence which is not the subject but which gives information about the subject. So, in the sentence Clare went to school, 'Clare' is the subject and 'went to school' is the predicate.
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Predicate

Pred'i·cate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Predicated ; present participle & verbal noun Predicating .] [ Latin praedicatus , past participle of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See Preach .]
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Predicate

Pred'i·cate intransitive verb To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation. Sir M. Hale.
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Predicate

Pred'i·cate noun [ Latin praedicatum , neut. of praedicatus , past participle praedicare : confer French prédicat . See Predicate , transitive verb ] 1. (Logic) That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propos
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/147

Predicate

Pred'i·cate adjective [ Latin praedicatus , past participle ] Predicated.
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predicate

verb phrase noun one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the predicate contains the verb and its complements
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Predicate

• (v. t.) To found; to base. • (v. t.) To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow. • (a.) Predicated. • (v. t.) The word or words in a proposition which express what is affirmed of the subject. • (v. t.) That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these pro
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predicate

(from the article `metaphysics`) ...can say that there are such things as individual horses, but one can also say that there is such a thing as being a horse, or as being upside ... ...one with two categorical propositions as premises and one categorical proposition as conclusion. When arguments of this type have exactly three ... .....
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predicate

predicate 1. The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula (which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix). Sometimes restricted to the main verb and its object or complement, to the exclusion of any adjunct. Also in logic and math; frequently in a wider use, an assertion or relation having one or more terms unspecified. 2
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Predicate

The four traditional kinds of categorical propositions (see Logic, formal, § 4) are: all S is P, no S is P, some S is P, some S is not P. In each of these the concept denoted by S is the subject and that denoted by P is the predicate. Hilbert and Ackermann use the word predicate for a propositional function of one or more variables, Carnap us...
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predicate

Traditionally, one of the two main parts of a sentence or clause, the other being the subject. In the sentence `The chicken crossed the road`, `the chicken` is the subject and `crossed the road` is the predicate. In the sentence `Parents make their children happy`, `parents` is the subject and `...
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Predicate

[grammar] There are two competing notions of the predicate in theories of grammar. The first concerns traditional grammar, which tends to view a predicate as one of two main parts of a sentence, the other part being the subject; the purpose of the predicate is to complete an idea about the subject, such as what it does or what it is like. T
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Predicate

[mathematical logic] In mathematics, a predicate is commonly understood to be a Boolean-valued function P: X→ {true, false}, called the predicate on X. However, predicates have many different uses and interpretations in mathematics and logic, and their precise definition, meaning and use will vary from theory to theory. So, for example, w
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predicate_(mathematical_logic)
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