Oxidation

This is a reaction with oxygen, as in combustion. An oxidized molecule is generally one that has lost electrons. Reduction also takes palce during oxidation - if one substance is oxidised then anothr must be reduced.

Oxidation

Combining with oxygen. Burning is oxidation. A chemical reaction in which oxygen combines with another substance or in which hydrogen atoms or electrons are removed from a substance.

oxidation

in a broad sense oxidation is the increase in positive valence of any element in a substance. On the basis of the electron theory, oxidation is a process in which an element losses electrons. In a narrow sense, oxidation means the chemical addition of oxygen to a substance.
Found on http://www.hach.com/chemGlossary

Oxidation

An algebraic increase in the oxidation number; may correspond to a loss of electrons.
Found on http://home.nas.net/~dbc/cic_hamilton/dictionary/a.html

oxidation

The formation of oxides or tarnish on the surface of a coin from exposure to humidity, air pollutants, or other environmental elements.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10142

Oxidation

The chemical addition of oxygen to break down pollutants or organizac waste; e.g., destruction of chemicals such as cyanides, phenols, and organic sulfur compounds in sewage by bacterial and chemical means.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Oxidation

In fats and oils, the process in which unsaturated fatty acids react with oxygen, resulting in rancidity.
Found on http://www.chowbaby.com/10_2000/glossary/glossary.html?synchpage=19&Z=75017

oxidation

[n] - the process of oxidizing
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=oxidation

Oxidation

A chemical reaction with oxygen from the air. Solvent-based paints dry, or cure, via an oxidation reaction.
Found on http://www.hobbyshed.co.uk/model_kit_modelmaking_guides_glossary_mnop.htm

Oxidation

the chemical or biochemical change that occurs when a substance combines with oxygen, for example during combustion and respiration; the release of carbon dioxide and energy from organic compounds
Found on http://www.oasisenviro.co.uk/Glossary%20N%20to%20R.htm

oxidation

(1) The complete, net removal of one or more electrons from a molecular entity (also called 'de-electronation'). (2) an increase in the oxidation number of any atom within any substrate (see HENDRICKSON, CRAM and HAMMOND (1970)). (3) Gain of oxygen and/or loss of hydrogen of an organic substrate. All oxidations meet criteria (1) and (2), and many m...
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/NO.html

Oxidation

burning in oxygen, normally highly exothermic (heat releasing), but also any increase in oxidization sate, (i.e. loss of electrons). Results in the formation of an oxide, rusting or corroding.
Found on http://www.bio-power.co.uk/glossary.htm

Oxidation

An algebraic increase in the oxidation number, may correspond to a loss of electrons.
Found on http://www.allchemicals.info/index/action/detail/keyword/O/id/1059568198.ph

oxidation

oxidize; oxidizing; oxidized. Compare with reduction. Oxidation is the loss of one or more electrons by an atom, molecule, or ion. Oxidation is accompanied by an increase in oxidation number on the atoms, molecules, or ions that lose electrons.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/o.shtml

oxidation

The term oxidation originally meant a reaction in which oxygen combines chemically with another substance. More generally, oxidation is a part of a chemical reaction in which a reactant loses electrons (increase oxidation number). Simultaneous reduction of a different reactant must occur (redox reaction).
Found on http://www.ktf-split.hr/periodni/en/abc/o.html

Oxidation

in a broad sense oxidation is the increase in positive valence of any element in a substance. On the basis of the electron theory, oxidation is a process in which an element losses electrons. In a narrow sense, oxidation means the chemical addition of oxy
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1205-Oxidation

Oxidation

A process in which an electron is lost by an atom, molecule or ion.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1215-Oxidation

Oxidation

The process of combining oxygen with some other substance or a chemical change in which and atom loses electrons.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1231-Oxidation

Oxidation

Swimming pool chemistry: The 'burning up' of organic waste and compounds in the pool water. It also refers to what you may see on your metal pool surfaces if your water is corrosive. Rust is a form of this kind of oxidation.
Found on http://www.1st-direct.com/acatalog/Chemical_Glossary.html

oxidation

(1) A reaction in which there is an increase in valence resulting from a loss of electrons. Contrast with reduction. (2) A corrosion reaction in which the corroded metal forms an oxide; usually applied to reaction with a gas containing elemental oxygen, such as air.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20742

Oxidation

Originally, oxidation meant a chemical reaction in which oxygen combines with another substance. The usage of the word has been broadened to include any reaction in which electrons are transferred. The substance which gains electrons is the oxidising agent
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20747

Oxidation

The action of combining any substance with oxygen. Oxidation may be rapid, as in an explosion; of moderate speed, as in the burning of solid fuels; or slow, as in the rusting of metals.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Oxidation

Chemical reaction between the surface elements and oxygen causing oxides of the elements to be formed.
Found on http://www.poeton.co.uk/w1/glossary.htm

Oxidation

The loss of electrons by a chemical species
Found on http://www.mpoweruk.com/glossary.htm

oxidation

A chemical process involving the combination of a material (usually a metal) with oxygen to produce a substance with substantially different physical and electrical characteristics from the base material.
Found on http://www.ami.ac.uk/courses/topics/0100_gls/glossary/glosso.htm
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