Litotes

understatement, for intensification, by denying the contrary of the thing being affirmed. (Sometimes used synonymously with meiosis.)
*A few unannounced quizzes are not inconceivable.
*War is not healthy for children and other living things.
*One nuclear bomb can ruin your whole day. (meiosis)
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Litotes

Figure of speech employing ironic understatement which affirms something by denying its opposite e.g. 'Earth has not anything to show more fair' from Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

litotes

[n] - understatement for rhetorical effect (especially when expressing an affirmative by negating its contrary)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=litotes

Litotes

a deliberate understatement, often designed to create a comic or sarcastic effect. e.g. In the middle of a furious argument, a third party might enter and say, 'Did I detect a slight difference of opinion here?'
Found on http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~media/hrc_style.html

Litotes

Li'to┬Ětes (lī'to*tēz) noun [ New Latin , from Greek lito`ths , from lito`s plain, simple.] (Rhet.) A diminution or softening of statement for the sake of avoiding censure or increasing the effect by contrast with the moderation shown in the form of expre
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/51

litotes

meiosis noun understatement for rhetorical effect (especially when expressing an affirmative by negating its contrary); `saying `I was not a little upset` when you mean `I was very upset` is an example of litotes`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=litotes

Litotes

• (n.) A diminution or softening of statement for the sake of avoiding censure or increasing the effect by contrast with the moderation shown in the form of expression; as, ` a citizen of no mean city,` that is, of an illustrious city.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/litotes/

litotes

a figure of speech, conscious understatement in which emphasis is achieved by negation; examples are the common expressions `not bad!` and `no mean ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/59

Litotes

In rhetoric, litotes (z, z or z) is a figure of speech in which understatement is employed for rhetorical effect {Citation needed span|when an idea is expressed by a denial of its opposite|reason=This association with denial of opposite was changed to a requirement in 404767755|date=March 2012}, principally via double negatives. For example, rathe
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Litotes

litotes

a deliberate understatement.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

litotes

litotes (lī'tutēz") , figure of speech in which a statement is made by indicating the negative of its opposite, e.g., “not many” meaning “a few.” A form of irony, litotes is meant to emphasize by understating. Its opposite is hyperbole.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0829976.html

litotes

The use of understatement for effect (`He is no Einstein` = `He is a bit dim`). It is the opposite of hyperbole
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038728.html

Litotes

A form of meiosis using a negative statement. (See more under discussion of meiosis.)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Litotes

A deliberate understatement.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

litotes

understatement by affirming using negation of the contrary
Found on http://phrontistery.info/l.html
No exact match found