leaching

  1. permeate; penetrate gradually; of liquids
  2. remove substances from by a percolating liquid

Leaching

is the process by which soluble matter is removed from soil or rock by the action of percolating water.

Leaching

The movement of a pesticide chemical or other substance downward through soil as a result of water movement.

Leaching

A process which can rid soils of bad substances, like salts.
Found on http://www.emilycompost.com/garden_glossary.htm

Leaching

The process by which soluble constituents are dissolved and filtered through the soil by a percolating fluid. (See leachate.)
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Leaching

Process by which soluble materials are dissolved and carried through the soil by a percolating liquid.
Found on http://grn.com/library/gloss.htm

Leaching

The loss of soluble material from decaying organisms
Found on http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/glossary.lmn.html

Leaching

The loss of nutrients, pesticides, lime, or other elements of the soil by the action of water as it percoolates through the soil profile.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=L

Leaching

the process by which soluble materials in the soil, such as salts and nutrients, are washed into a lower layer of soil or are dissolved and carried away by water. See also: Water.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/l/e/leaching/source.html

leaching

Generally leaching is the dissolution of elements from a surface into the surrounding fluid medium. For the soldering community, the term applies to the action of liquid solder dissolving metals such as silver from surfaces. A particular case where leaching has been observed is the chip ceramic capacitor, whose inner terminals are typically of sil...
Found on http://www.ami.ac.uk/courses/topics/0100_gls/glossary/glossl.htm

leaching

Removal of valuable metals form ores by microbial action. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?leaching

Leaching

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Leach
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/leaching/

leaching

(from the article `fission-track dating`) ...hundred million electron volts of energy and produces a large amount of radiation damage before its energy is fully absorbed. The damage, or ... Oxides are leached with a sulfuric acid or sodium carbonate solvent, while sulfates can be leached with water or sulfuric acid. Ammonium hydroxide i...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/25

leaching

in geology, loss of soluble substances and colloids from the top layer of soil by percolating precipitation. The materials lost are carried downward ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/25

leaching

Type: Term Pronunciation: lēch′ing Definitions: 1. Removal of the soluble constituents of a substance by running water through it. 2. Solubilization of metals, typically from poor ores, using lithotrophic bacteria.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=48544

Leaching

[pedology] In pedology, leaching is the loss of mineral and organic solutes due to percolation. It is a mechanism of soil formation distinct from the soil forming process of eluviation, which is the loss of mineral and organic colloids. Leached and elluviated materials tend to be lost from topsoil and deposited in subsoil. A soil horizon ac...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaching_(pedology)

Leaching

[metallurgy] Leaching is a widely used extractive metallurgy technique which converts metals into soluble salts in aqueous media. Compared to pyrometallurgical operations, leaching is easier to perform and much less harmful, because no gaseous pollution occurs. Drawbacks of leaching are the highly acidic and in some cases toxic residual eff...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaching_(metallurgy)

Leaching

[chemistry] Leaching is the process of extracting minerals from a solid by dissolving them in a liquid, either in nature or through an industrial process. In the chemical processing industry, leaching has a variety of commercial applications, including separation of metal from ore using acid, and sugar from beets using hot water. In a typic...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaching_(chemistry)

Leaching

[agriculture] In agriculture, leaching refers to the loss of water-soluble plant nutrients from the soil, due to rain and irrigation. Soil structure, crop planting, type and application rates of fertilizers, and other factors are taken into account to avoid excessive nutrient loss. Leaching may also refer to the practice of applying a small...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaching_(agriculture)

Leaching

Process in which water removes and transports soil humus and inorganic nutrients in solution.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/l.html

Leaching

the removal of a substance (such as a dyestuff) by a liquid which is in contact with the substance.
Found on http://www.textilesintelligence.com/glo/index.cfm?SECTION=L

leaching

leaching, method of extraction in which a solvent is passed through a mixture to remove some desired substance from it. A simple example is the passage of boiling water through ground coffee to dissolve and carry out the chemicals necessary for producing the beverage. Another example is the removal ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0829131.html

leaching

Process by which substances are washed through or out of the soil. Fertilizers leached out of the soil drain into rivers, lakes, and ponds and cause water pollution. In tropical areas, leaching of the soil after the destruction of forests removes scarce nutrients and can lead to a dramatic loss of soil fertility. The leaching of soluble minerals in...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0023674.html

LEACHING

The process of drawing out excess liquid through a porous substance.
Found on http://www.rexart.com/glossary.html

leaching

the washing out of soluble substances from soil or rock, by water percolating through.
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm
No exact match found