induction

See embryonic induction or enzyme induction.

Induction

The process by which an enzyme is synthesised in response to the presence of an external substance, the inducer. Also, the activation of an occult pathogen, leading to progressive infection and disease; in particular, the provoked transformation of a provirus into a virulent (cytocidal) virus.

induction

Type: Term Pronunciation: in-dŭk′shŭn Definitions: 1. Production or causation. 2. Production of an electric current or magnetic state in a body by electricity or magnetism in an adjacent body. 3. The period from the start of anesthetization to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for a surgical procedure. 4. In embryo...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=44282

Induction

cell differentiation which is brought about by the influence of cytokines released by cells of another type.
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

induction

[n] - the process whereby changes in the current flow in a circuit produce magnetism or an EMF 2. [n] - an electrical phenomenon whereby an electromotive force (EMF) is generated in a closed circuit by a change in the flow of current 3. [n] - the act of bringing about something (especially at an early time)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=induction

Induction

If labour has not started at an appropriate time or if there are maternal indications for delivery before labour starts naturally, medications may be used to induce labour.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20415

induction

In philosophy, the process of observing particular instances of things in order to derive general statements and laws of nature. It is the opposite of deduction, which moves from general statements...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

induction

Increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme in response to the action of an inducer or environmental conditions. Note: Often the inducer is the substrate of the induced enzyme or a structurally similar substance (gratuitous inducer) that is not metabolized.
Found on http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossaryi.html

Induction

Power transfer without contact. For example, the charging of dead or neutral fence wires which run parallel to live ones. The closer the Live and neutral wires and the further the distance they travel together, the greater the amount of induced voltage.
Found on http://www.electricfence-online.co.uk/ishop/1047/shopscr21.html

Induction

In·duc'tion noun [ Latin inductio : confer French induction . See Induct .] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. « I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this time, as the affair now stands, the
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/47

induction

The act or process of inducing or causing to occur, especially the production of a specific morphogenetic effect in the developing embryo through the influence of evocators or organisers or the production of anaesthesia or unconsciousness by use of appropriate agents. ... Origin: L. Inductio ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?induction

induction

noun the act of bringing about something (especially at an early time); `the induction of an anesthetic state`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=induction

induction

noun stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; `the elicitation of his testimony was not easy`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=induction

induction

inductive reasoning noun reasoning from detailed facts to general principles
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=induction

induction

(in-duk´shәn) the process or act of causing to occur. the production of a specific effect in an embryo by an organizer or other force. the production of anesthesia or unconsciousness by use of appropriate agents. labor induction the initiation or intensif...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Induction

• (n.) The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. • (n.) The property by which one body, having electrical or magnetic polarity, causes or induces it in another body without direct contact; an impress of electrical or magnetic force or condition from one body on another without actual ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/induction/

induction

in embryology, process by which the presence of one tissue influences the development of others. Certain tissues, especially in very young embryos, ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/19

induction

in enzymology, a metabolic control mechanism with the effect of increasing the rate of synthesis of an enzyme. In induction, synthesis of a specific ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/19

induction

in logic, method of reasoning from a part to a whole, from particulars to generals, or from the individual to the universal. As it applies to logic ... [15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/19

induction

(L. inductio) the act or process of inducing or causing to occur, especially the production of a specific morphogenetic effect in the developing embryo through the influence of evocators or organizers, or the production of anaesthesia or unconsciousness by use of appropriate agents.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio45.html

Induction

[Death Note episode] http://new.photos.yahoo.com/kiranfromsagar/album/576460762305028068/photo/294928803002918367/20 == anil == The author of this image Kiran Sagara(http://new.photos.yahoo.com/kiranfromsagar/albums) has graciously released all rights. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_(Death_Note_episode)

Induction

[teachers] Induction is used to refer to a period during which a Newly Qualified Teacher in England or Wales is both supported and assessed to ensure that regulatory standards are met. ==Background== Although probation periods for new teachers had only been dropped in 1992, the Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998 introduced arrangements ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_(teachers)

Induction

[play] An Induction in a play is an explanatory scene or other intrusion that stands outside and apart from the main action with the intent to comment on it, moralize about it or in the case of dumb show to summarize the plot or underscore what is afoot. Inductions are a common feature of plays written and performed in the Renaissance perio...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_(play)

Induction

[electricity and magnetism] The result of the debate was no consensus. Note that administrator mikka was a contributor to this article and could reasonably be expected to have nominated this for deletion if he felt it was necessary. howch``e``ng {chat} 19:31, 5 January 2006 (UTC) ===Silly dance moves in Lindy=== It`s nice that people find s...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_(electricity_and_magnetism)

Induction

Inference of a generalized conclusion from particular instances. In a science like Physical Geography, inductive reasoning would involve the development of a theory to explain previously collected facts or observed phenomenon.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/i.html
No exact match found