Host

[event] { #ifexpr: ({{{1}}) >= 2383276 and ({{1}}) = 2383306 and ({{1}}) = 2383335 and ({{1}}) = 2383365 and ({{1}}) = 2383394 and ({{1}}) = 2383423 and ({{1}}) = 2383452 and ({{1}}) = 2383482 and ({{1}}) = 2383511 and ({{1}}) = 2383541 and ({{1}}) = 2383571 and ({{1}}) = 2383601 and ({{1}}) < 2383630 | { #expr: ({{{1}}) - 2383600 }} }}{Chi
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_(event)

Host

[Paradise Lost album] Host is a studio album recorded by British band Paradise Lost. The album saw the band moving further away from their previous metal sound to something more akin to a melancholy style of synthpop. ==Track listing== All tracks by Nick Holmes and Gregor MacKintosh, except where noted. ==Personnel== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_(Paradise_Lost_album)

HOST

Something that provides a hospitable environment within which agents reside. This can be a specific part of the operating system or it can be recursive and provided by another agent.
Found on http://www.glossarycentral.com/p2p/host.html

Host

[network] A network host is a computer connected to a computer network. A network host may offer information resources, services, and applications to users or other nodes on the network. A network host is a network node that is assigned a network layer host address. Computers participating in networks that use the Internet Protocol Suite ma
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_(network)

Host

[Stargate] The result of the debate was Keep (4 keeps, 1 delete, 1 merge) Renata3 17:27, 28 December 2005 (UTC) ===Saint Petersburg Democratic Club=== Page was created because of the small controversy generated by the ad mentioned in the article (certainly for no other reason). But the controversy is probably not even big enough to include
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_(Stargate)

host

Organism which serves as the habitat for a parasite, or possibly for a symbiont. A host may provide nutrition to the parasite or symbiont, or simply a place in which to live.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5ecol.html

Host

Any plant material that will support a parasite. Oak trees will host mistletoe that will create damage and oaks can also host Spanish moss that does no harm.
Found on http://www.emilycompost.com/garden_glossary.htm

Host

1. In genetics, the organism, typically a bacterium, into which a gene from another organism is transplanted. 2. In medicine, an animal infected or parasitized by another organism.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Host

An organism that contains another organism.
Found on http://filebox.vt.edu/cals/cses/chagedor/glossary.html

host

A plant that supports the growth and development of the parasite that has infected it.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_H.htm

Host

An Internet company providing storage space for web sites on their server computer(s).
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/glo-2.htm

Host

Organism that furnishes food, shelter or other benefits to another organism of a different species.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

host

[Verb] To look after visitors or guests.
Example: The school asked for families to host visiting children from France.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

host

[n] - (medicine) recipient of transplanted tissue or organ from a donor 2. [n] - a person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there 3. [n] - the owner or manager of an inn 4. [n] - any organization that provides resources and facilities for a
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=host

Host

A remote machine whose contents can be accessed via the TCP/IP network.
Found on http://www.multimania.co.uk/support/glossary/H/

Host

(NETWORK GLOSSARY) Computer system on a network. Similar to the terms device or node except that host usually implies a computer system, whereas device and node generally apply to any networked system, including communication servers and routers.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/newworkglossary.html

Host

A domain name that has an IP address record associated with it; any computer system connected to the Internet.
Found on http://www.everlands.co.uk/glossary.htm

Host

A computer that houses, serves and maintains files for a website. A critical element in any hosting solution is a fast connection to the Internet.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

Host

from a user's point of view, a host is a computer or service which allows you access to the Internet. - more technically, it is a computer running a protocol stack which is connected to a network - each host has a numeric address which is unique to the network, and usually a host name as well - in this context, the protocol stack will probably be t
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Host

A computer that is connected to a TCP/IP network, including the Internet.
Found on http://www.net-progress.co.uk/glossary.htm

Host

The controlling computer
Found on http://www.amplicon.co.uk/info/glossary.cfm

HOST

The host is a computer with a Web server that serves the pages for one or more Web sites. A host can also be the company that provides that service, which is known as hosting. 4) In other contexts, the term generally means a device or program that provides services to some smaller or less capable device or program.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20632

HOST

A term used in AREXX programming. A Host is the program used to execute a particular command, such as a paint package to batch convert a sequence of images.
Found on http://www.amigahistory.co.uk/h.html

Host

1.A computer system accessed by a user from a remote location. In the case of two computer systems connected via modem, the 'host' is the system containing the data and the 'remote' is the computer at which the user is working. 2.A computer that is connected to a TCP/IP network, including the Internet. Each host has a unique IP address. 3.As a verb
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20660

host

A molecular entity that forms complexes with organic or inorganic guests, or a chemical species that can accommodate guests within cavities of its crystal structure. Examples include cryptands and crowns (where there are ion-dipole attractions between heteroatoms and positive ions), hydrogen-bonded molecules that form 'clathrates' (e.g. hydroquinon
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/H.html
No exact match found