Force

manipulation of environmental factors to make a plant blossom out of season.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20003

force

[n] - (physics) the physical influence that produces a change in a physical quantity 2. [n] - group of people willing to obey orders 3. [n] - a group of people having the power of effective action 4. [n] - a powerful effect or influence 5. [n] - physical energy or intensity 6. [v] - force into or from an action or state,
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=force

Force

A push or pull.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20442

Force

Forces can cause an object to speed up, slow down, change direction or change shape (if they are unbalanced). Forces are either push forces or pull forces. The SI unit of force is the newton
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Force

The capacity to cause physical change.
Found on http://www.testometric.co.uk/glossarye-h.html

Force

A force is that which when acting on a body that is free to move accelerates the motion of the body. The SI unit of force is the newton. 1 newton is defined as the force required to accelerate a mass of 1 kilogram by 1 metre per second per second.Conversions1 dyne=1x10-5 N1 poundal (pdl)=0.138255 N1 pound-force (lbf)=4.44822 N1 ton-force
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/f/o/force/source.html

Force

A vector quantity which tends to change the condition of rest of a rigid body.
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

force

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Gravity) Basically a 'push' or a 'pull' - usually causing a change of motion.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Force

An entity that when applied to a mass causes it to accelerate. Sir Isaac Newtons Second Law of mation states: the magnitude of a force = mass * acceleration.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/795-Force

force

An entity that when applied to a mass causes it to accelerate. Sir Isaac Newton's Second Law of mation states: the magnitude of a force = mass * acceleration.
Found on http://www.shodor.org/UNChem/glossary.html

force

Forces are pushes and pulls that make things move or change shape.
Found on http://www.gcse.com/glos.htm

Force

That which produces or tends to produce a change of motion or shape of a body. Measured in pounds or dynes.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

force

An action (transfer of energy) that will accelerate a body in the direction of the applied force. See Newtons Laws of Motion
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Force

Force transitive verb [ See Farce to stuff.] To stuff; to lard; to farce. [ R.] « Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit.» Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/57

Force

Force noun [ Of Scand. origin; confer Icelandic fors , foss , Danish fos .] A waterfall; a cascade. [ Prov. Eng.] « To see the falls for force of the river Kent.» T. Gray.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/57

Force

Force noun [ French force , Late Latin forcia , fortia , from Latin fortis strong. See Fort , noun ] 1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exerci
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/57

Force

Force transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Forced ; present participle & verbal noun Forcing .] [ Old French forcier , French forcer , from Late Latin forciare , fortiare . See Force ,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/57

Force

Force intransitive verb [ Obsolete in all the senses.] 1. To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor. « Forcing with gifts to win his wanton heart.» Spenser. 2. To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/57

force

<physics> Rate of change of momentum with time. Forces are said to cause accelerations via f = ma (Newton's law). ... There are four primary forces known presently: the gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces. The gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range (dropping as 1/distance^2), while the nucl
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?force

force

personnel noun group of people willing to obey orders; `a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=force

force

forcefulness noun physical energy or intensity; `he hit with all the force he could muster`; `it was destroyed by the strength of the gale`; `a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=force

force

thrust verb impose or thrust urgently, importunately, or inexorably; `She forced her diet fads on him`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=force

force

ram verb force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically; `She rammed her mind into focus`; `He drives me mad`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=force

force

(fors) energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion or other activity. electromotive force the force that, by reason of differences in potential, causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current. reserve force ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Force

• (n.) To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind. • (n.) A waterfall; a cascade. • (n.) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce. • (n.) Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally,
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/force/
No exact match found