Feedback

A loop in information flow or in cause and effect.
Found on http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/FLAOH/cbnhtml/glossary.html

Feedback

High pitched squeal when a microphone picks up acoustically from a speaker to which it is connected. Also Howl Round.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Feedback

The giving of information to subjects about their performance on a test. See also biofeedback.
Found on http://www.psychics.co.uk/define/

Feedback

The giving of information to subjects about their performance on a test. See also biofeedback.
Found on http://www.psychicscience.org/paraglos.xhtml

Feedback

a system of control, where work being done is modified by the product. For example the blood pressure is maintained by the strength of the heart beat and the muscle tone of the arterioles. In the walls of the large arteries are receptors sensitive to the degree of stretch in the muscle wall. As the blood pressure increases, the wall are stretched,
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

feedback

[n] - the process in which part of the output of a system is returned to its input in order to regulate its further output 2. [n] - response to an inquiry or experiment
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=feedback

Feedback

1) The delayed signal sent back to the input of a delay line, used in repeat-echo effects.
2) The pickup of the signal out of a channel by its input or the howling sound that this produces.
3) In an amplifier, the phase reversed output signal sent back to its input, reducing gain but also distortion and noise.
4) This occurs when the sound
Found on http://www.testing1212.co.uk/a.htm

Feedback

The ongoing reaction given by an audience to those communicating, which helps them evaluate the success of their communication. Feedback may be verbal or non-verbal (e.g. through facial expressions or action).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Feedback

When the sound being produced by the output signal (from a loudspeaker) is picked up by the input (in a kind of circular loop). When feedback reaches a certain level it causes an exponential rise in the level of certain frequencies, such as the screaming howl familar to guitarists and microphone users, or in the case of lower frequencies, a kind of
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Feedback

A sound produced by A string or microphone picking up and amplifying its own signal from A loudspeaker
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Feedback

Occurs when a coach, coachee, colleagues or group report back honestly and objectively regarding an incident, a situation or behaviours relevant to the progress of a coaching intervention.
Found on

Feedback

Occurs when some or all of the output of the device (such as an amplifier) is taken back to the input. This may be accidental (such as the acoustic feedback from a speaker to microphone) or intentional, to reduce distortion, as used in a closed-loop control process. See also: Negative Feedback.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/f/e/feedback/source.html

Feedback

Learners value feedback highly. In many instances, feedback will be linked to some form of assessment. Valid feedback is based on observation of students` behaviours. Feedback should be practical, timely and concrete. The ability to give feedback in a form that is useful to the listener is important. This should include style and the ability to pre
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20808

Feedback

the reinvestment of some of the profits into new inputs within the factory system.
Found on http://geographyfieldwork.com/GeographyVocabularyGCSEIndustry.htm

Feedback

Feedback: Many biologic processes are controlled by feedback, just as the temperature in a home from a furnace is regulated by a thermostat.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3403

feedback

Where the output from a system directly affects the input.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

feedback

<physiology> The return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?feedback

feedback

noun response to an inquiry or experiment
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=feedback

feedback

noun the process in which part of the output of a system is returned to its input in order to regulate its further output
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=feedback

feedback

(fēdĀ“bak) the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges.For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

feedback

(from the article `electronics`) ...in temperature, in particular, can cause changes in resistor values and changes in the amplification properties of transistors. These factors must ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/15

feedback

in biology, a response within a system (molecule, cell, organism, or population) that influences the continued activity or productivity of that ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/15

feedback

the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio34.html

feedback

Type: Term Pronunciation: fēd′bak Definitions: 1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; regulation of a furnace by a thermostat. 2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system. 3. The feeling e
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=32405

Feedback

[radio series] Feedback is a series broadcast on BBC Radio 4, presented by Roger Bolton. ==History== Originally a 15-minute programme, Feedback began in 1979 replacing Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells. Amongst its earlier presenters were Colin Semper, a former head of Religious Broadcasting, and Susan Marling. Mary Whitehouse, a regular critic
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feedback_(radio_series)
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