faience

The name given to the French tin-glazed earthenware which developed from Italian maiolica. The term is also used for tin-glazed earthenware products from Germany and Scandinavia; the British equivalent of faience is delftware, the Dutch delft. Faience was first produced in any quantity in France from the late 16thC, mainly by Italians (the term der …...

Faience

A glazed material, with a base of either carved soapstone or moulded clay, with an overlay of blue/green colored glass.
Found on http://www.egyptartsite.com/glossary.html

faience

[n] - glazed earthenware decorated with opaque colors
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=faience

faience

glazed tilework
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

faience

Any glazed earthenware, using crushed quartz. Faience was used in ancient Egypt for amulets, tiles, and small statues, although the term itself derives from the Italian city of Faenza, famous for...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Faience

glazed earthenware, usually cream, used as a decorative cladding, particularly in the earlier 20th century, retail, cinema and industrial facades (first manufactured at Faenza in Italy). It is produced by firing twice, first without and then with a glaze.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Faïence

Fa`ï·ence' noun [ French, from Faenza , a town in Italy, the original place of manufacture.] Glazed earthenware; esp., that which is decorated in color.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/3

faience

noun glazed earthenware decorated with opaque colors
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=faience

Faience

• (n.) Glazed earthenware; esp., that which is decorated in color.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/faience/

faience

tin-glazed earthenware made in France, Germany, Spain, and Scandinavia. It is distinguished from tin-glzed earthenware made in Italy, which is called ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/3

faience

faience (fāens', –äns', fī–) [for Faenza, Italy], any of several kinds of pottery, especially earthenware made of coarse clay and covered with an opaque tin-oxide glaze. The term is particularly applied to the ceramic ornaments and figurines of the ancient Egypti...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0818131.html

Faience

Faience is imitation porcelain, a kind of fine pottery, superior to the common pottery in its glazing, beauty of form, and richness of painting, and of which several kinds are distinguished by critics. It derived its name from the town of Faenza, in Italy, where a fine sort of pottery called majolica was manufactured as early as the 14th century. T...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AF.HTM

faience

A material made of crushed quartz, lime, plant ash, or natron used to make a variety of objects including amulets and vessels. It is pressed into a mold, covered in glaze, and fired to form a vitreous-like material.
Found on http://www.love-egypt.com/egyptian-glossary.html

Faience

a material, a bit like clay, made from sand and other materials. It was shaped when soft then coated with a glaze that was often bright blue, although many other colours were used. The material was then fired to make the glaze shiny. It was in very common use, especially for jewellery and small amulets. It was much cheaper to copy semi-precious sto...
Found on http://www.egyptweb.norfolk.gov.uk/eggloss.htm

faience

Is the name given to french tin-glazed earthenware developed from Italian maiolica.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-f.html

Faience

Faience or faïence (s or -; lang) is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed pottery on a delicate pale buff earthenware body, originally associated with Faenza in northern Italy. The invention of a white pottery glaze suitable for painted decoration, by the addition of an oxide of tin to the slip of a lead glaze, was a major advance...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faience

faience

glazed coloured earthware
Found on http://phrontistery.info/f.html
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