Deregulation

The lessening or complete removal of government regulations on an industry, especially concerning the price that firms are allowed to charge and leaving price to be determined by market forces.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/d.html

Deregulation

The removal of controls on a particular market aimed at improving the economic efficiency of that market and therefore the performance of the economy at the microeconomic level. Deregulation is generally considered a supply side policy. An example would be the abandonment of a licensing system for taxis.
Found on http://www.bized.co.uk/reference/glossary/index.htm?glosid=567

deregulation

the process of removing or diluting the rules which govern the operation of certain companies or areas of industry. In the media, this refers especially to the move, in western Europe, away from state-regulated broadcasting systems towards systems which are more open to market forces. -
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20164

deregulation

[n] - the act of freeing from regulation (especially from governmental regulations)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=deregulation

Deregulation

The removal of controls on a particular market aimed at improving the economic efficiency of that market and therefore the performance of the economy at the microeconomic level. Deregulation is generally considered a supply side policy. An example would be the abandonment of a licensing system for taxis.
Found on http://www.bized.co.uk/virtual/dc/resource/glos2.htm

deregulation

Action to abolish or reduce government controls and supervision of private economic activities, with the aim of improving competitiveness. In Britain, the major changes in the City of London in 1986...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

deregulation

deregulating noun the act of freeing from regulation (especially from governmental regulations)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=deregulation

deregulation

(from the article `Business Overview`) ...to consumers. In Europe, where there had been more than $100 billion of utility mergers since April 2005, further consolidation loomed after the ... ...during the previous 10 years the demand for electric power in the United States had grown at the same time that the nature of delivering ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/33

DEREGULATION

In insurance, reducing regulatory control over insurance rates and forms. Commercial insurance for businesses of a certain size has been deregulated in many states.
Found on http://www.glossarycentral.com/insurance/deregulation.html

Deregulation

Deregulation is when government reduces its role and allows industry greater freedom in how it operates. == Overview == The stated rationale for deregulation is often that fewer and simpler regulations will lead to a raised level of competitiveness, therefore higher productivity, more efficiency and lower prices overall. Opposition usually involve
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deregulation

deregulation

A government policy designed to remove regulations on market activity.
Found on http://polisci.nelson.com/glossary.html

Deregulation

Removal or relaxation of regulations or controls governing a business or service operation such as utilities.
Found on http://www.puc.state.pa.us/telecom/areacode/area_code_dictionary.xhtml

deregulation

Action to abolish or reduce government controls and supervision over private economic activities, with the aim of improving competitiveness. This may lead to an increase in company mergers and acquisitions, but also bankruptcies. A wider array of services and lower prices in some industries may also result; see also monetarism; privatizatio...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0027927.html

Deregulation

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unempl
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22402
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