That

That pron., adjective , conj., & adverb [ Anglo-Saxon ðæt , neuter nom. & acc. sing. of the article (originally a demonstrative pronoun). The nom. masc. sē , and the nom. fem. seó are from a different root. Anglo-Saxon ðæt is akin to Dutch dat , German
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/38

That

• (pron., a., conj., & adv.) As a conjunction, that retains much of its force as a demonstrative pronoun. • (pron., a., conj., & adv.) To introduce a purpose; -- usually followed by may, or might, and frequently preceded by so, in order, to the end, etc. • (pron., a., conj., & adv.) As a demonstrative pronoun (pl. Those), that usuall
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/that/

That

[music] A thāt (ठाट; थाट; ঠাট; ٹھاٹھ; also transliterated as thaat) is a mode in northern Indian or Hindustani music. Thāts always have seven different pitches (called swara) and are a basis for the organization and classification of ragas in North Indian classical music. == System == The modern thāt system was cre
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That_(music)

That

The word that is used in the English language for several grammatical purposes: In the Old English language that was spelled þæt. It was also abbreviated as a letter Thorn, þ, with the ascender crossed, ꝥ ( ). In Middle English the letter Ash, æ, was replaced with the letter a, so that that was spelled þat, or sometimes þet. The ascender o
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That
No exact match found