Rake

[band] Rake was an art rock/noise rock musical ensemble from Northern Virginia (near Washington, DC), founded in 1989. Not aligned with the post-punk/hardcore bands more commonly associated with the local underground music scene, Rake took a more experimental route and were more closely associated with fellow Virginia-based bands Pelt and W
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rake_(band)

Rake

A face-off maneuver in which a player sweeps the ball to the side.
Found on http://www.cheyennelacrosse.com/Page.asp?n=13952&org=cheyennelacrosse.com

Rake

[angle] A rake is an angle of slope measured from horizontal, or from a vertical line 90° perpendicular to horizontal. A 60° rake would mean that the line is pointing 60 up from horizontal, either forwards or backwards relative to the object. ==Use== There are many ways in which the term can be used. The rake of a ships prow measures the
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rake_(angle)

Rake

[cellular automaton] A rake in a cellular automaton is a puffer that, instead of leaving behind a trail of debris, emits a stream of spaceships. In Conway`s Game of Life, the discovery of rakes was one of the key components needed to form the breeder, the first known patterns in Life in which the number of live cells exhibits quadratic grow
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rake_(cellular_automaton)

Rake

The incline of a stage floor or seating area away from the horizontal. Originally introduced as a way of improving sightlines to the stage under poor lighting conditions last century.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

rake

[n] - a dissolute man in fashionable society 2. [n] - a long-handled tool with a row of teeth at its head 3. [v] - sweep the length of 4. [v] - move through with or as if with a rake 5. [v] - level or smooth with a rake 6. [v] - gather with a rake
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rake

RAKE

A multi-channel receiver technique which uses separate correlator channels to add several multipath signal components. These time-shifted components can be either naturally arising from multipath effects or through use of soft handover. The correlator outputs are combined to deliver an improved signal. Used in CDMA systems.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Rake

How sloped the floor of an auditorium or stage is.
Found on http://www.queens-theatre.co.uk/technical/glossaryoftheatreterms.htm

Rake

Many stage floors, usually in theatres built for dance or variety, are higher at the back than at the front, to give the audience a better view. These stages are said to be "raked", and the "rake" is the angle of slope from back to front. In most modern theatres it is the audience seating that is raked, not the stage.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21207

Rake

This refers to the amount of money, in chips, taken by the house as a service fee.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20611

Rake

Slope, particularly of a mast.
Found on http://www.go-sail.co.uk/dglossr.html

Rake

to move the tip of the mast forward or backwards
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Rake

A vertical vein of metallic ore, usually lead, occuring between walls of rock and cutting through the bedding. Often rakes have been worked from early times leaving deep trenches several km long, with adits leading off and shafts sunk at the side.
Found on http://www.keystothepast.info/durhamcc/k2p.nsf/k2pGlossaryList?readform&let

Rake

Trim members that run parallel to the roof slope and form the finish between the wall and a gable roof extension. The angle of slope of a roof rafter, or the inclined portion of a cornice.
Found on http://www.rookinspections.com/glossary/glossaryr.shtml

Rake

Rake (rāk) noun [ Anglo-Saxon race ; akin to OD. rake , Dutch reek , Old High German rehho , German rechen , Icelandic reka a shovel, and to Goth. rikan to heap up, collect, and perhaps to Greek 'ore`gein to stretch out, and English
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Raked (rākt); present participle & verbal noun Raking .] [ Anglo-Saxon racian . See 1st Rake .] 1. To collect with a rake; as, to rake hay; -- often
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake (rāk) intransitive verb 1. To use a rake, as for searching or for collecting; to scrape; to search minutely. « One is for raking in Chaucer for antiquated words.» Dryden. 2. To pass with violence or rapidity; to scrape along. « Pas could n
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake noun [ Confer dial. Swedish raka to reach, and English reach .] The inclination of anything from a perpendicular direction; as, the rake of a roof, a staircase, etc. ; especially (Nautical) , the inclination of a mast or funnel, or, in general, of any part of a vessel no
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake intransitive verb To incline from a perpendicular direction; as, a mast rakes aft. Raking course (Bricklaying) , a course of bricks laid diagonally between the face courses in a thick wall, to strengthen it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake noun [ Middle English rakel rash; confer Icelandic reikall wandering, unsettled, reika to wander.] A loose, disorderly, vicious man; a person addicted to lewdness and other scandalous vices; a debauchee; a roué. « An illiterate and frivolous old rake .»
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

Rake

Rake intransitive verb 1. [ Icelandic reika . Confer Rake a debauchee.] To walk about; to gad or ramble idly. [ Prov. Eng.] 2. [ See Rake a debauchee.] To act the rake; to lead a dissolute, debauched life. Shenstone. To rake out (Falconry) ,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/7

rake

1. An implement consisting of a headpiece having teeth, and a long handle at right angles to it, used for collecting hay, or other light things which are spread over a large surface, or for breaking and smoothing the earth. ... 2. A toothed machine drawn by a horse, used for collecting hay or grain; a horserake. ... 3. [Perhaps a different word. ..
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?rake

rake

noun a long-handled tool with a row of teeth at its head; used to move leaves or loosen soil
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rake

rake

rakehell noun a dissolute man in fashionable society
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rake

rake

slant noun degree of deviation from a horizontal plane; `the roof had a steep pitch`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rake
No exact match found