Oracle

A person, such as a priestess, through whom a deity is held to respond when consulted; a shrine consecrated to the worship and consultation of a prophetic deity; a person considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinions.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Oracle

(a) An answer to a question, believed to come from the gods.
(b) a shrine at which these answers are given.
Found on http://www.psychics.co.uk/define/

Oracle

(a) An answer to a question, believed to come from the gods. (b) a shrine at which these answers are given.
Found on http://www.psychicscience.org/paraglos.xhtml

oracle

A mechanism to produce the predicted outcomes to compare with the actual outcomes of the software under test. After [adrion]
Found on http://www.testingstandards.co.uk/living_glossary.htm

oracle

[n] - a prophecy (usually obscure or allegorical) revealed by a priest or priestess 2. [n] - a shrine where an oracular god is consulted
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=oracle

ORACLE

On-Line Inquiry and Report Generator (UNIX DB program)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Oracle

Oracle Database, the flagship relational database management system (RDBMS) software product released by Oracle Corporation, has undergone several name-changes, and users may also refer to it as Oracle RDBMS or simply Oracle.
Found on http://www.somersetwebservices.co.uk/glossary.php

oracle

Sacred site where a deity gives answers or oracles, through the mouth of its priest, to a supplicant's questions about personal affairs or state policy. These were often ambivalent. There were more...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Oracle

Alongside the BBC's Ceefax, this was the original name for ITV's teletext service, which ran from 1973 to 1993. It is now simply known as Teletext, following a change of operating company, and also covers the teletext services of Channel 4 and Channel 5.
Found on http://www.screenonline.org.uk/education/glossary.html

Oracle

Or'a·cle noun [ French, from Latin oraculum , from orare to speak, utter, pray, from os , oris , mouth. See Oral .] 1. The answer of a god, or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry respecting some affair or future event, as the success of an enterpr
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/27

Oracle

Or'a·cle intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Oracled ; present participle & verbal noun Oracling .] To utter oracles. [ Obsolete]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/27

oracle

noun a shrine where an oracular god is consulted
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=oracle

oracle

noun a prophecy (usually obscure or allegorical) revealed by a priest or priestess; believed to be infallible
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=oracle

Oracle

• (n.) The sanctuary, or Most Holy place in the temple; also, the temple itself. • (n.) A wise sentence or decision of great authority. • (n.) The answer of a god, or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry respecting some affair or future event, as the success of an enterprise or battle. • (n.) One who communicates a div
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/oracle/

Oracle

(from the article `Computers and Information Systems`) Database firm Oracle, which had been buying up corporate software firms, acquired Hyperion Solutions for $3.3 billion. Hyperion provided ... Oracle bought Siebel Systems, which made software for managing customer relationships, for $5.85 billion. It was part of Oracle`s continuing e...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/25

oracle

(Latin oraculum from orare, `to pray,` or `to speak`), divine communication delivered in response to a petitioner`s request; also, the seat of ... [16 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/25

oracle

oracle 1. Someone, or something, considered to be a source of knowledge, wisdom, or prophecy. 2. A wise or prophetic statement. 3. In ancient Greece and Rome, a shrine dedicated to a particular god, or goddess, where people went to consult a priest, or priestess, in times of trouble or uncertainty. One of the most famous was the Delphic Oracle of
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1497/2

Oracle

The USS Oracle was an American Auk Class minesweeper of 890 tons displacement launched in 1942. The USS Oracle was powered by diesel engines providing a top speed of 18 knots and carried a complement of 105. She was armed with one 3 inch dual-purpose gun and two 40 mm anti-aircraft guns.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RO.HTM

oracle

  1. an authoritative person who divines the future
  2. a prophecy (usually obscure or allegorical) revealed by a priest or priestess; believed to be infallible
  3. a shrine where an oracular god is consulted

Found on

oracle

See test oracle....
Found on http://www.imbus.de/glossar/

oracle

oracle, in Greek religion, priest or priestess who imparted the response of a god to a human questioner. The word is also used to refer to the response itself and to the shrine of a god. Every oracular shrine had a fixed method of divination. Many observed signs, such as the motion of objects droppe...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0836762.html

oracle

Sacred site where a deity gives answers or oracles, through the mouth of its priest, to a supplicant's questions about personal affairs or state policy. These were often ambivalent. There were more than 250 oracular seats in the Greek world. The earliest example was probably at Dodona (in Epirus)......
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006197.html

Oracle

Computer software development company, founded by Larry Ellison in 1977, and originally specializing in database management systems. Oracle was initially known as Software Development Laboratories, and then as Relational Technologies. In the high-tech field, its shares are second in value only to those of Microsoft
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0096633.html

Oracle

Software Company generally associated with database information systems and the internet.
Found on http://www.agcotechnologies.com/saen/glossary.htm

oracle

A religious custom where people asked the Oracle questions or sought advice. The Oracle was supposed to give the answers of the gods.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/arts_and_theatre
No exact match found