Model

In the sciences, a model is an estimate of how something works. A model will usually have inputs and outputs that correspond to its real-world counterpart. An adaptive system also contains an implicit model of its environment that allows it to change its behavior in anticipation of what will happen in the environment.
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Model

Describing the behaviour of economic or business variables (influencing factors) involved
Found on http://www.bized.co.uk/reference/glossary/index.htm?glosid=288

Model

A simplified representation of a system (which may be expressed in word, diagrammatic or mathematical terms). The use of model in a scientific context implies (1) that the thing being represented cannot be directly observed, or, in some cases, directly manipulated, and (2) that the model itself is in some degree hypothetical and subject to validat
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Model

any paperfold at any stage in the folding process or after the folding has been completed. The use of the word model to describe a paperfold does not imply that the design is representational.
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model

[n] - someone worthy of imitation 2. [n] - a person who poses for a photographer or painter or sculptor 3. [n] - a representative form or pattern 4. [n] - a simplified description of a complex entity or process 5. [n] - a type of product 6. [n] - representation of something (sometimes on a smaller scale) 7. [n] - the
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Model

Used as a verb, to model means to build a 3D object. Used as a noun, it means the 3D object created as the end product of the modelling process. A variety of different methods are used in 3D modelling, including polygonal, NURBS, Sub-D and metaball techniques.
Found on http://www.computerarts.co.uk/downloads/3d__and__animation/the_3d_world_glo

Model

A copy of an object that is n times smaller than the fullsize object. See also: Mathematical Model.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/m/o/model/source.html

Model

A practical description of how something works, whose purpose is to be useful.
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Model

Mod'el noun [ French modèle , Italian modello , from (assumed) Latin modellus , from modulus a small measure, dim. of modus . See Mode , and confer Module .] 1. A miniature representation of a thing, with the several parts in due proportion;
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/85

Model

Mod'el adjective Suitable to be taken as a model or pattern; as, a model house; a model husband.
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Model

Mod'el transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Modeled or Modelled ; present participle & verbal noun Modeling or Modelling .] [ Confer French modeler , Italian modellare .] To plan or form after a patt
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/85

Model

Mod'el intransitive verb (Fine Arts) To make a copy or a pattern; to design or imitate forms; as, to model in wax.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/85

model

1. A representation of something, often idealised or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand. ... 2. Something to be imitated. ... 3. In dentistry, a cast. ... Origin: It. Midello, fr. L. Modus, measure, standard ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
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model

theoretical account noun a hypothetical description of a complex entity or process; `the computer program was based on a model of the circulatory and respiratory systems`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=model

model

simulation noun representation of something (sometimes on a smaller scale)
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model

modelling noun the act of representing something (usually on a smaller scale)
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model

poser noun a person who poses for a photographer or painter or sculptor; `the president didn`t have time to be a model so the artist worked from photos`
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model

noun someone worthy of imitation; `every child needs a role model`
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model

verb construct a model of; `model an airplane`
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model

sit verb assume a posture as for artistic purposes; `We don`t know the woman who posed for Leonardo so often`
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model

verb plan or create according to a model or models
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model

something built or drawn to show how something much larger would look
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Model

• (n.) Something intended to serve, or that may serve, as a pattern of something to be made; a material representation or embodiment of an ideal; sometimes, a drawing; a plan; as, the clay model of a sculpture; the inventor`s model of a machine. • (n.) A person who poses as a pattern to an artist. • (n.) Any copy, or resemblance, mor
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/model/

model

(from the article `set theory`) ...axiom when a meaning has been assigned to `set` and `,` as specified by , is either true or false. If each axiom is true for , then is called a ... ...is possible to transform certain semantic problems into sharper syntactic problems. It has been asserted, for example, that non-Euc...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/105

model

(from the article `myth`) The function of models in physics, biology, medicine, and other sciences resembles that of myths as paradigms, or patterns, of the human world. In ... The process of dissection was early taken to its limit in the kinetic theory of gases, which in its modern form essentially started with the ... The example o...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/105
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