macrame

[n] - a coarse lace 2. [v] - make knotted patterns
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=macrame

macramé

Craft technique in which threads, yarns, or cords are knotted together to form an open textile structure. Traditionally practised by sailors, it is thought to have originated in the 13th century,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

macrame

noun a coarse lace; made by weaving and knotting cords
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=macrame

macramé

(from Turkish makrama, `napkin,` or `towel`), coarse lace or fringe made by knotting cords or thick threads in a geometric pattern. Macramé was a ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/5

Macramé

Macramé or macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. Its primary knots are the square knot and forms of "hitching": full hitch and double half hitches. It was long crafted by sailors, especially in elaborate or ornamental knotting forms, to decorate anything from knife handles to bottles to parts of shi..
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macramé

Macramé

knotted threadwork.
Found on http://www.textilesintelligence.com/glo/index.cfm?SECTION=M

macramé

macramé (măk'rumā") , a technique of decorative knotting employing simple basic knots to create a multitude of patterns. The term derives from an Arabic word for braided fringe. Its first known use was recorded by Arabs in the 13th cent. During the next hundred years it sp...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0831039.html

Macrame

Macrame is decorative knotting. It originated in Arabia and was used for home furnishings during the 19th century and then in the 1960s as a decoration for dresses, then in the 1990s in jumpers and handbags.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PM.HTM

macramé

Craft technique in which threads, yarns, or cords are knotted together to form an open textile structure. Traditionally practised by sailors, it is thought to have originated in the 13th century, when Arab weavers began decoratively knotting the threads along the edges of the items they had woven. The craft then spread to Europe and China, where it
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010618.html
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